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ImprovingEvaluation

VIC

Date and time: Wednesday 11th September 2019 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Digital Transformation and Evaluation - How the evaluand is becoming digital and how can we harness digital technology to stay relevant in the new world?
Presenters: Jen Riley, Clear Horizon
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: Friday 6th September 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 21st August 2019 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Piloting a whole-of-government model for resourcing and delivering system-wide evaluation – key insights and lessons
Presenters: Lauren Costello - Department of Premier and Cabinet, Victoria, Kon Jew-Chung - Department of Premier and Cabinet, Victoria and Patricia Rogers - Evidence and Evaluation Hub
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: Monday 19th August 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 17th July 2019 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Evidence Based Policy Making - What is evaluation’s role in policy making and how can we have more influence?
Presenters: Eleanor Williams, Department of Health and Human Services
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 15th July 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 19th June 2019 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Participatory Evaluation: from the Gaza Strip to Sydney Road, Brunswick
Presenters: Tim Budge, Tribal Strategies and Alison Preston, Anglican Overseas Aid
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 17th June 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 15th May 2019 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: The Lived Experience Evaluators Project
Presenters: Anna Strempel, Asylum Seeker Resource Centre
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 13th May 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 17th April 2019 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Social network analysis: Uses in evaluation
Presenters: Matt Healey and Dan Healy, First Person Consulting
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 15th April 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 20th March 2019 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Counterfactual Impact Evaluation - Evaluating business programs using the Business Longitudinal Analytic Database Environment
Presenters: Professor Beth Webster, Swinburne University of Technology
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 18th March 2019

Date and time: Monday 1st - Tuesday 2nd April 2019, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Room 8 at Jasper Hotel, 489 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne VIC 3000
Presenter: Ian Patrick, Ian Patrick & Associates Pty Ltd
Register online by: 25 March 2019
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

About the workshop

Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Frameworks are becoming increasingly important for developing an agreed approach to the assessment of results achieved and to aid organisational learning. The M&E Framework identifies expected results, key evaluation questions and the means to answer these questions through routine monitoring and periodic evaluation. It also provides a guide to the implementation of M&E processes over the life of a program or other initiative. Monitoring and evaluation functions are essential to the effective operation of programs and will contribute to the overall value derived from them.

Date and time: Wednesday 20th February 2019 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: From Traditional to Developmental evaluator in 12 months
Presenters: Zazie Tolmer, Clear Horizon
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 17th February 2019

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and time: Monday 18th February 2019, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Gardenia room at Adina Apartment Hotel,189 Queen Street, Melbourne, Vic 3000
Facilitators: Duncan Rintoul & Vanessa Hood
Register online by: 14 February 2019
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Purpose of Workshop

This one-day course has been custom designed for people who want to commission better evaluations. It is for people with a role in planning, commissioning and managing evaluations. It is suitable for beginners through to those with a few years' experience. 

The training is interactive and hands-on, with lots of practical examples and group activities through the day to keep the blood pumping and the brain ticking. It will provide you with tools that you can start using immediately..

Date and time: Wednesday 21st November 2018 5.30 - 7.00 pm. After the seminar, please join the Vic committee for some wine, cheese and laughter, as we draw the 2018 seminar season to a close.
Topic: Avoiding Evaluation Disasters
Presenters: John Owen, Anne Markiewicz, Anthea Rutter
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 19th November 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and time: Thursday 29th November 2018, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Waratah room at Adina Apartment Hotel Melbourne, 189 Queen Street, Melbourne, Vic 3000
Facilitator: Deborah Rhodes
Register online by: 26th November 2018
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

About the workshop

The context for this workshop is the idea that different cultural values have an influence on the notion and practice of evaluation in diverse contexts.  In practice, the workshop aims to support evaluators who undertake evaluations in multi-cultural settings or in cultural contexts other than their own.  It provides a framework for understanding cultural value differences and an opportunity for discussion about the implications of this framework for evaluation practice.  The workshop proposes a set of approaches, skills and tools that may be useful. 

Date and time: Wednesday 17th October 2018 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Evaluating place-based approaches
Presenter: Shannon Newman, Our Place
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 15th October 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and time: Wednesday 12th September 2018 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Evaluating Value for Money
Presenter: Michelle Besley of Collective Insights & Byron Pakula of Clear Horizon
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 10th August 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and time: Wednesday 15th August 2018 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Enhancing the effect of evaluations on program and organisational learning
Presenter: Farida Fleming, Assai
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 13th July 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and time: Wednesday 8th August, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Topic: Practical Evaluation Capacity Building: Whose capacity to do what, why and how?
Location: Waratah room at Adina Apartment Hotel,189 Queen Street, Melbourne, Vic 3000
Facilitators: Vanessa Hood and Duncan Rintoul, Rooftop Social
Register online by: Friday 3rd August 2018
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Workshop Overview

This one-day course is for anyone who has a role (or would like to develop a role) in evaluation capacity building, in government, the community sector or business. It is suitable for people who are just starting to design an evaluation capacity building approach, through to those who have a few years’ experience under their belt.

Through a series of interactive and participatory exercises, you learn about:

  • Defining the need for evaluation capacity at different levels of an organisation (e.g. capacity to conduct evaluations vs. commission them vs. ensuring that findings are used).
  • Business systems and processes needed to support and evaluative thinking and practice in an organisation (e.g. data and project management systems).
  • Designing a successful professional learning program. This includes training, as well as various other other options to consider (e.g. coaching, peer mentoring, communities of practice).
  • Managing and governing evaluation capacity building programs, including the question of how to evaluate the ECB program itself.

Through the day, you will develop a plan that sets out your proposed approach to evaluation capacity building in your context. You can then start using (or at least consulting on) this plan immediately when you get back to your workplace.

You can expect facilitated group activities and practical examples to keep you awake and engaged throughout the day.

Date and time: Wednesday 18th July 2018 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: What is the place of e-valuation in evaluation practice?
Presenter: Dr. Amy Gullickson and Dr. Ghislain Arbour, Centre for Program Evaluation, University of Melbourne
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 16th July 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and time: Thursday 19th July 2018, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Gardenia room at Adina Apartment Hotel Melbourne, 89 Queen Street, Melbourne 3000
Facilitator: Jess Dart, Clear Horizon
Register online by: Friday 13 July 2018
Fees (GST inclusive):  Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

About the workshop

Design thinking and social innovation processes are becoming increasingly prevalent in Australia. Social innovation and ‘service design’ require evaluative thinking and ways to test prototypes and pilots, and there are new and growing needs for evaluators to work with designers. However, many evaluators don’t know the language or the promise that this new area of work presents. Equally many designers don’t think to draw on the skills of evaluation. Understanding the interface between Design and Evaluation is critical for the positioning of evaluation and evaluative thinking in modern organisations.

This workshop will introduce the concept of ‘human-centred design’ and then explore how evaluators can work effectively at different stages and phases of the design cycle. You will learn about the new ”InDEEP” framework which provides a menu of different evaluation approaches to select across the design cycle. We use a practical case study of a design process to lift school attendance in a disadvantaged school. Participants will be invited to practice some hands-on exercises in small groups. The workshop will include a mix of presentation and small-group experiential processes.

Date and time: Wednesday 20th June 2018 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: From latrines to China’s One Child Policy: Insights to the use of experimental evaluation techniques – RCTs, natural experiments and lab-style behavioural experiments
Presenter: Lisa Cameron, The University of Melbourne
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 18th June 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and time: Wednesday 16th May 2018 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Foundations of Rubric Design
Presenter: Dr. Krystin Martens, Centre for Program Evaluation, University of Melbourne
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 14th May 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and time: Wednesday 18th April 2018 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Involving children with disability in research and consultation
Presenter: Associate Professor Erin Wilson, Deakin University
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: lunchtime on Monday 16th April 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

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Evaluation Essentials

Dates and time: Monday 30 April, Tuesday 1 May, and Wednesday 2 May 2018, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am) each day

Program:
Day 1, April 30: Stream 1: Fundamentals of Program Evaluation / Stream 2: Theories of Evaluation
Day 2, May 1: Stream 1: How to deal with squeaky wheels and engagement fatigue: Evaluating community engagement / Stream 2: Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Evaluation
Day 3, May 2: Stream 1: Facilitation and Participatory Approaches for Evaluators / Stream 2: Introduction to Social Network Analysis

Please note that each stream is a one day workshop so there are two workshops to choose from each day. Registrants can attend one, two or three days.

Facilitators:
Stream 1: John Owen, Jess Dart, and Vanessa Hood and Natalie Moxham
Stream 2: Brad Astbury, Sarah Mason, and Matt Healey and Dan Healy

Target audience: Emerging practitioners, project managers, supervisors. Mixed audience from the private, Government, NFP/NGO, and Community sectors.

Location: Melbourne Metropole Central Hotel, 44 Brunswick Street, Fitzroy
Situated in the heart of Melbourne's cafe district, the Metropole is also adjacent to Melbourne's CBD. More details on venue: http://www.metropolecentral.com.au/ Corporate accommodation rates available

Registrations close: Early bird: 15 April. Final registrations: 26 April

Fees (GST inclusive):

 Type   Early bird  After 15 April
      AES members
 Day rate  $440.00   $484.00
 3 days   $1,320.00   $1,460.00
      Non-members
 Day rate  $605.00    $665.00
 3 days   $1,724.00   $1,895.00
      Student day rate*   $250.00   $250.00

 * Students must send proof of their full-time student status to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Download flyer including registration form

Please note: if you would like to do a mix of workshops from different streams, then please complete the registration form. Alternatively when you register online, select either stream 1 or stream 2 and then enter the workshop names in the Special Requirements box or send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with the workshops you would like to attend. Please note that each stream is a one day workshop so there are two workshops to choose from each day.

Date and time: Wednesday 21st March 2018 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Developmental Evaluation
Presenter: Dr. Jess Dart, Clear Horizon Consulting
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: Friday16th February 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your networks.

Date and time: Friday 16th February 2018, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Arbour room, Ether Conference Centre, Level 14, 265-281 Little Bourke St, Melbourne VIC 3000 ((NB: venue is located within The Swanston Hotel, Grand Mercure)
Presenter: Krystin Martens
Register online by: Monday 12 February 2018 (extended)
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Purpose of Workshop

This workshop will focus on how to design rubrics to make evaluative reasoning explicit and enable practitioners to transparently draw evaluative conclusions. A rubric is a tool that outlines the criteria and standards used to judge performance. It is a matrix that outlines how evaluative determinations are made, which can enhance stakeholder buy in.

Date and time: Wednesday 28 February, 2018 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Understanding evaluation contexts: Introducing the Framework for Situation Awareness in Program Evaluation
Presenter: Sarah Mason; Centre for Program Evaluation, University of Melbourne
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: Friday 23rd February 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES.

Workshop title: Designing and Implementing a Monitoring and Evaluation System
Dates and time: 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th March 2018 (4 days) 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am) each day

  • Monday 5th March: Introduction to Designing and Implementing a Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation System; 
  • Tuesday 6th March: Planning for Monitoring and Evaluation functions; 
  • Wednesday 7th March: Developing System Capabilities for Data Collection and Analysis; 
  • Thursday 8th March: Developing System Capabilities for Reflection and Reporting for Learning and Program Improvement

People can choose to participate in the full program or part of the program dependent upon their experience and needs

Location: Conference room # 9 at Jasper Hotel, Level 1, 489 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne 3000
Facilitators: Anne Markiewicz and Ian Patrick
Registrations close:  Friday 23 February 2018
Fees (GST inclusive): For all 4 workshops: Members $1,650, Non-members $2,270. For day workshops: Members $440, Non-members $605 (per day)

About the 4-day Intensive Workshop

Designing and implementing a Monitoring and Evaluation System for a program or an organisation is becoming an increasingly important task required to support the assessment of agreed results and to aid organisational learning for program improvement. A robust and well-considered Monitoring and Evaluation System is also required to determine the scope and parameters of routine monitoring and periodic evaluation processes; to identify how monitoring and evaluation data will be collected and analysed; and to determine how data will be used to inform learning and reporting for accountability, program improvement and decision-making. The Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (PGPA) Act (2013) and the Department of Finance Resource Management Guide No.131 ‘Developing Good Performance Information’ (April 2015) affirm the importance of planning to identify program intentionality and to outline how a program’s performance will be measured and assessed.

This workshop draws on the text book ‘Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks’ (SAGE, 2016) authored by Anne Markiewicz and Ian Patrick. It presents a clear and staged conceptual model for the systematic development and implementation of an M&E System. The workshop has been developed with four separate, but inter-related components, with one presented each day:

  • Day One (Mon 5 March) provides an introduction to the principles of designing and implementing a participatory monitoring and evaluation system based on program theory and program logic
  • Day Two (Tues 6 March) identifies how to plan for monitoring and evaluation functions
  • Day Three (Wed 7 March) focuses on data collection and analysis processes
  • Day Four (Thurs 8 March) covers learning and reporting for program improvement and decision-making.

The four day intensive training program is structured in such a way that participants can enrol in all four days, thereby providing a comprehensive guide to developing an M&E System. Alternatively, participants can enrol in any one or more of the training days depending on their prior experience, needs and orientation. Each day will be structured as a stand-alone event in terms of content.

This modular training approach should appeal to participants who have already attended a two-day ‘Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks’ workshop delivered by Anne Markiewicz or Ian Patrick and would like to receive an extension through more content provided on the implementation of monitoring and evaluation plans focused on processes of data collection, analysis, learning and reporting (Days 3&4).

Date and time: Wednesday 18 October 2017. 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Evaluation of philanthropically funded initiatives: A funder's perspective on what good evaluation looks like
Presenter: Dr Squirrel Main, The Ian Potter Foundation
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: Friday 13th October 2017

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC branch of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES.

Date and time: Wednesday 15th November 2017 5.30 - 7.00 pm - to be followed by wine & cheese to celebrate the end of the year
Topic: Climate Change Adaptation - what is it, and how do you evaluate it?
Presenters: Martin Pritchard, PREA, and Damien Sweeney, Clear Horizons
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: Friday 10th November 2017

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC branch of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES.

Date and time: Monday 13th - Tuesday 14th November 2017, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Gardenia room at Adina Melbourne, 189 Queen Street, Melbourne
Presenter: Anne Markiewicz, Anne Markiewicz and Associates
Register online by: Thursday 9th November 2017 (Extended due to public holiday)
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

About the workshop

Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Frameworks are becoming increasingly important for developing an agreed approach to the assessment of results achieved and to aid organisational learning. The M&E Framework identifies expected results, key evaluation questions and the means to answer these questions through routine monitoring and periodic evaluation. It also provides a guide to the implementation of M&E processes over the life of a program or other initiative. Monitoring and evaluation functions are essential to the effective operation of programs and will contribute to the overall value derived from them.

Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks support decision-making, resource allocation and a process of regular program-focused reflection and learning leading to program refinement and improvement over time. The Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (PGPA) Act (2013) and the Department of Finance Resource Management Guide No.131 ‘Developing Good Performance Information’ (April 2015) affirm the importance of planning to identify program intentionality and to outline how a program’s performance will be measured and assessed.

This workshop follows the structure of the text book ‘Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks’ authored by Anne Markiewicz and Ian Patrick (Sage 2016). It will present a clear and staged conceptual model for the systematic development of an M&E Framework. It will examine a range of steps and techniques involved in the design and implementation of the framework; explore potential design issues and implementation barriers; cover the development of Program Theory and Program Logic; the identification of key evaluation questions; the development of performance indicators; and the identification of processes for multi-method data collection, on-going analysis and reflection based on data generated.

The facilitator will encourage interactive peer to peer dialogue to share experiences and learning, and also draw on case studies to encourage application of knowledge and skills to evaluation contexts.

Date and time: Wednesday 20 September 2017. 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Are we losing the plot? Principles and Practice of Good Graphics
Presenter: Sue Finch, Statistical Consulting Centre, The University of Melbourne & Matthew Johnson, Intelligence and Analysis, EPA Victoria
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: Friday 15th September 2017

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC branch of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES.

Seminar overview

“The greatest possibilities of visual display lie in vividness and inescapability of the intended message.” (John Tukey, 1990)

What are the principles and practice of good graphics that underlie effective communication of patterns in data or the results of statistical models?

Sue Finch will present five principles for producing quality graphical displays and briefly touch on the theory underlying these principles. The presentation will cover common mistakes that result in poor quality graphs, and how these be avoided. Using a range of examples, Sue will provide practical tips and checks for producing “vivid” visual displays.

Matthew Johnson will present a range of data visualisations used in his work at EPA Victoria and in two winning entries of Victoria’s annual Budget Hack competition. As a communication tool, simple clear visuals allow us to express complex ideas quickly and intuitively. With modern web technologies audiences can now engage with these ideas interactively and on their own terms. Matt will discuss where the data visualisation has worked and share his experiences of where it has not.

Presenter background

Sue Finch is a statistical consultant at the Statistical Consulting Centre at the University of Melbourne. She works with clients from government, business, industry and academic, across a broad spectrum of applications. The effective use of statistical graphics is an important part of her approach to consulting. She also teaches courses in statistics, and has a research interest in statistical education, and effective representation and communication of statistical data and concepts.

Matthew Johnson is a Senior Analyst with the Intelligence and Analysis Team of EPA Victoria. With a background in freshwater ecology Matthew has always used data visualisation of communicate complex ideas. As an EPA analyst data visualisation is used to provide insights into regulatory and environmental issues. For the last two years Matthew has been on the winning team of Victoria’s Budget Hack competition and also picked up an award at Govhack 2016.

AES Evaluator’s Professional Domain of Competence:

7 – Evaluation Activities. Conduct data collection activities, use existing data, integrate data from multiple sources, report findings in formats that are useful for client and key stakeholders.
4 – Research Methods and Systematic Enquiry – employ valid quantitative data with rigour, and where possible to statistical confidence levels, use software, internet and other technological tools to facilitate effective data collection and analysis.


Date and time: Wednesday 16 August 2017. 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: When "what works" doesn't
Presenter: Patricia Rogers, ANZSOG
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: Monday 14th August 2017

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC branch of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES.

Seminar overview

 A common approach to evidence-based policy and practice is to try to find ‘what works’ and then recommend universal compliance with that approach, program, product or process. Yet the history of evaluation and research has identified many situations where this approach is not only ineffective but actually risks making things worse.
This session will provide a rapid tour of some of these situations - including meaningless means, goal displacement, inadequate sampling, exclusion of relevant evidence, dodgy data, and rapidly decaying generalisations - and outlines alternative approaches that aim to build more valid and useful evidence and processes to support better use of this evidence for policy and practice. The session will also engage in an exploration of what evaluators, evaluation managers and evaluation societies can and ought to do to encourage evidence users to go beyond ‘what works’. 

Presenter background

Patricia Rogers is Professor of Public Sector Evaluation at the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG) and Director of BetterEvaluation, an international collaboration to improve monitoring and evaluation by creating and sharing knowledge about choosing and using methods and processes. She is an experienced evaluator who has worked on evaluations and evaluation systems for 30 years in programs and policies in a wide range of sectors, with national, state and local government departments and agencies in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Malaysia, South Africa, USA and UK, UN agencies, international philanthropic foundations, development banks and NGOs. Her book on program theory with Sue Funnell, Purposeful Program Theory: Effective Use of Theories of Change and Logic Models, provides detailed guidance on developing, representing and using theories of change and logic models. She is currently working on a new book When ‘What Works’ Doesn’t’ which challenges reductionist approaches to evidence-based policy and practice. 


Date and time: Friday 18 August 2017, 9am to 5:00pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Room 8 - Jasper Hotel, 489 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne 3000 (near Queen Victoria Market)
Presenter: Jess Dart, Clear Horizon Consulting
Register online by: Tuesday 15th August 2017
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Date and time: Wednesday 19 July 2017. 5.30 - 7.00 pm
Topic: Impact evaluation: The counterfactual and beyond
Presenter: Brad Astbury, Centre for Program Evaluation, University of Melbourne
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Register online by: Friday 14th July 2017

This is a free seminar organised by the VIC branch of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Victoria and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES.

Seminar overview

There is emerging consensus that no single approach is best for addressing the variety of questions that need to be answered in order to provide a comprehensive account of program impact. Policy-makers and practitioners want to know whether the program worked, often to satisfy accountability requirements. Yet, they also want to know for whom, how, why and under what circumstances interventions work or fail to work. This knowledge is important to support learning, replication and transferability efforts.

Drawing on recent trends in impact evaluation, this presentation reviews several different options that evaluators can draw on to inform design decisions. The first part of the seminar addresses some foundational issues in impact evaluation, including the centrality of causation. The next part examines experimental and quasi-experimental approaches, and notes some important caveats to their application. A select overview of alternative approaches and strategies is then provided with a particular emphasis on the broad family of theory-based impact evaluation approaches (i.e. realist evaluation, contribution analysis, qualitative comparative analysis, process tracing and Scriven’s modus operandi method). The presentation will conclude by emphasising the merits of Cronbach’s functional approach to designing impact evaluations.

Presenter background

Brad Astbury is a lecturer at the University of Melbourne, Centre for Program Evaluation (CPE), where he teaches introductory and advanced evaluation theory and methodology subjects within the Masters of Evaluation.

Brad has 15 years of experience in evaluating programs, mainly in the area of criminal justice, health, and education. Brad is co-author of three books, many journal articles and book chapters and numerous commissioned reports. Recent publications have appeared in the American Journal of Evaluation, Evaluation, Interdisciplinary Journal of Social Sciences, and Advances in Program Evaluation book series.

His main areas of interest are evaluation theory, social research methodology, and impact evaluation.

AES Evaluator’s Professional Domain of Competence: 4. Research Methods / Systematic Inquiry


 

Date and time: Wednesday 21st June 2017. 5.30pm - 7.00pm
Topic: Strong communities. Strong culture. Stronger children: Measuring trends to turn the tide on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child safety and removal
Presenters: Dr. Arno Parolini and Wei Wu Tan, University of Melbourne
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, 15-31 Pelham St Carlton
Register online by: Friday 16 June 2017
This is a free seminar organised by the VIC branch of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with other AES members in Victoria, to share and learn from the experiences of other evaluators.

When the ground-breaking Bringing Them Home report into the Stolen Generations was released in 1997, nearly 20 years ago, mainstream Australia was shocked to learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children represented 20 per cent of children living in out-of-home care (Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, 1997). Now, in 2016, that rate has increased to see Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children represent over 35 per cent of children living in out-of-home care (AIHW, 2016a).

Despite numerous legal and policy frameworks designed to advance safety, and family and cultural connections for children, the rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care is almost ten times that of non-Indigenous children, and continues to grow at an alarming rate (AIHW, 2016a).

The Family Matters report contributes to efforts to change this story by beginning to measure both the extent of the problem as well as progress towards implementing evidence-informed solutions that aim to eliminate the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care.

Come and hear from a panel of speakers involved in developing the report: the University of Melbourne, the Centre for Evidence and Implementation and SNAICC – National Voice for our Children
Please note that the speakers from SNAICC will be confirmed closer to the seminar date.


 

Date and time: 22 June 2017, 9am to 5:00pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Moon Space Room at Ether Conference Centre. 265 - 281 Little Bourke Street, Melbourne VIC 3000
Presenter: Jess Dart
Register online by: 20 June 2017
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50 

Program logic is a simplified model of expected cause-and-effect relationships between activities, immediate changes, intermediate outcomes and final outcomes. This workshop introduces the program logic concept and lays out a step by step process for creating a logic model. The workshop concludes with an overview of how this logic model can be used for program design and to be the spine of a monitoring, evaluation, reporting and improvement framework.

Course Outcomes

By the end of this course attendees should be able to:

  • have the confidence and ability to develop a simple program logic model
  • understand how program logic can be used for planning and for monitoring and evaluation
Benefits to your organisation
  • projects will be outcome focused
  • provides the organisation with a framework for evaluating the impact and effectiveness of projects
  • KPI and organisational performance monitoring frameworks can be better aligned to projects achievements
Benefits to you
  • understand the uses of program logic and the key concepts
  • be able to build a simple program logic model for your project
  • know how program logic is useful for project planning, monitoring and evaluation 

Jess Dart

 

 

About Jess Dart

Jess Dart's professional interests are in evaluation methods, evaluation theory, collaborative approaches, and strategic planning. She has a PhD in program evaluation and an MSc in Sustainable Agriculture. Her doctoral research involved adapting and testing a story-based monitoring and evaluation tool named the 'Most Significant Change' technique (MSC). She went on to co-author the user-guide with Rick Davies, now translated into 12 different languages. 

Jess is the founder of Clear Horizon Consulting a medium sized consulting company specialising in evaluation and strategy.
Jess has over 20 years experience in developing program logic and theory of change for both design and evaluation – having facilitated hundreds of workshops for projects, programs, strategies, policies and whole Departments. As well as being highly versed in logic, Jess is also a highly demanded facilitator and trainer. 

Date and Time: Wednesday 17th May 2017. 5.30pm - 7.00pm
Presenters: Anthony Aisenberg, CrowdSpot and Zoe Condliffe, Plan International Australia
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton
Register by: Friday 12th May

In early 2016, a nation-wide survey commissioned by Plan International Australia and Our Watch revealed approximately one third (30 per cent) of young Australian women aged 15-19 report avoiding public places after dark, with approximately 23 per cent believing it’s not safe to travel alone on public transport.

In an effort to further understand and draw attention to the experiences of young women in cities, Plan International Australia and CrowdSpot launched the Free To Be project in October 2016. The project focuses on encouraging young women to share their safety related experiences and emotions directly to a custom built CrowdSpot map. Thousands of submissions were received, generating interesting insights for keys stakeholders such as the City of Melbourne and Victoria Police.

Anthony Aisenberg and Zoe Condliffe will present together on the development and design of the mapping platform as a data collection tool, the process of engaging with key stakeholders and some of the insights gained from the data.

Anthony Aisenberg is an established urban planner and Founder of CrowdSpot, a map-based community engagement platform and company leading the way at the intersection between urban planning, citizen engagement and technology. CrowdSpot has completed over 45 projects with clients across Australia and in the USA in areas such as transport and public safety. In 2016, CrowdSpot was recognized at the Planning Institute of Australia awards for Planning Excellence in the 'Public Engagement and Community Planning' category.

Zoe Condliffe is the Youth and Community Engagement Advisor at Plan International Australia. With a background in sociology, gender, arts and community practice, Zoe has founded several community development initiatives working across the non-profit, arts, university and corporate sectors. As an experienced facilitator and gender equality advocate, she builds youth-led movements that work closely with young people as the central agents of social change.

For enquiries regarding this seminar please contact: Farida Fleming - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with other AES members in Victoria, to share and learn from the experiences of other evaluators.

AES Evaluator’s Professional Domain of Competence:
2. Evaluation Theory; 4. Research Methods and Systematic Enquiry; 7. Evaluation Activities

Date and time: 19 April 2017, 5:30 to 7:00pm
Seminar topic: Chains of logic: Overcoming limitations of program theory and its use in evaluation
Presenter: Dr Ian Patrick, Ian Patrick and Associates
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South

Register online by: 17 April 2017

The use of program theory has become commonplace in evaluation practice, but not without accompanying critique. This seminar explores means to make program theory a more useful approach. The widespread adoption of forms of program theory such as program logic in evaluation is evident in how it is employed as a means to check understandings of the relationship between program action and expected results, and as a reference point to assess subsequent program performance. Despite this perceived utility, critique of program theory mounts. It is viewed by some as representing a narrow conceptualisation of change, as a linear sequence of cause and effect, while reality is more complex. Others point to the systemic nature of programs, with many influences on change often ignored in program theory. Further critique relates to the difficulty of arriving at a unified program theory when stakeholders have varied perceptions and influences on change. Few efforts have been made to refine program theory in response to such critique.

This seminar explores four possible enhancements of the use of program theory by (a) use of a different means to identify, investigate and test assumptions (and related evaluation questions) (b) use of broader and more holistic categories of action in program logic, such as strategies (c) identifying and representing systemic factors outside the immediate program but influential on change, and linking these to program logic (d) use of participatory methods to capture different stakeholder perspectives on change. The seminar will explore the relative merits of these enhancements, opportunities to combine different elements, and their potential contribution to the utility of the program theory approach.

Dr Ian Patrick is an independent consultant and Director of Ian Patrick & Associates. His career as an evaluator extends over 20 years and covers both Australia and the Asia Pacific region. He has broad experience across different social sectors such as health, education, law and justice, community development, and human rights and Indigenous issues. Ian has worked with a range of organisations and programs in developing monitoring and evaluation systems, and conducted evaluation-related training programs. He is joint author of Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks (SAGE, 2016). Ian is an Honorary Senior Fellow, Development Studies Program, University of Melbourne.

Date and Time: Wednesday 15th March, 2017 5.30 - 7.00 pmAnneMarkiewicz18 200
Topic: Joining Up the Pieces: Developing Connected Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks to Identify Initiative Level Results
Presenter: Anne Markiewicz, Director Anne Markiewicz and Associates
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South

There is no charge for this seminar.

Online registrations close: 13th March 2017 

Larger initiatives and strategies that address complex issues often involve subsidiary programs and projects. Initiatives may be multi-site or even multi-country. They may involve a single model operating in different sites, or a cluster of varied models with common goals. Developing inter-connected Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks that guide the initiative and its programs and projects is at the complex end of evaluation practice. A useful approach entails the development of cascading and tiered program theories and program logics, evaluation questions and indicators, as well as the use of consistent and integrated data collection approaches and data analysis processes. Considerable skill development is involved in developing inter-connected Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks that can effectively harness cumulative results across the initiative. This presentation will present an approach for linking Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks at the different levels of initiative, program and project. It will further identify associated capacity building requirements for the effective implementation of connected Frameworks. There will opportunity for discussion of the approach and its application to evaluation practice.

Anne Markiewicz is a leading evaluator with over 20 years’ experience designing monitoring and evaluation frameworks, developing and implementing a range of evaluations, and designing and delivering evaluation training. She has delivered training programs in Australasia, in the Pacific and in the US and UK. Anne has considerable experience developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks and designing Monitoring and Evaluation systems for large multi-country and multi-site initiatives. Anne received the AES’s ‘Outstanding Contribution to Evaluation Award’ in 2013 and in 2008 the ‘Indigenous Evaluation Award'. She was made a fellow of the AES in 2015. Anne, together with Ian Patrick, is an author of the text book ‘Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks’ that was released by SAGE publishers in July 2015.

AES Evaluator’s Professional Domain of Competence: Systematic Enquiry

Two-day workshop facilitated by Anne Markiewicz: Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks (Melbourne 20th and 21st March 2017)

Date and time: Monday 20th and Tuesday 21st of March 2017, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Arbour Room, Ether Conference Centre, Lower Level, 265 Little Bourke Steet, Melbourne, Victoria (located with the Mercure)
Note: Self-parking is available at Wilson Parking, located within close proximity to Ether Conference Centre at 222 Russell Street (between Lonsdale and Little Bourke Streets). A discounted rate of $15.00 is available to delegates who validate their parking ticket at our hotel reception desk.
Presenter: Anne Markiewicz
Workshop full
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

About the workshop
Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Frameworks are becoming increasingly important for developing an agreed approach to the assessment of results achieved and to aid organisational learning. The M&E Framework identifies expected results, key evaluation questions and the means to answer these questions through routine monitoring and periodic evaluation. It also provides a guide to the implementation of M&E processes over the life of a program or other initiative. Monitoring and evaluation functions are essential to the effective operation of programs and will contribute to the overall value derived from them. M&E Frameworks should support decision-making, allocation of resources and program refinement based on lessons learned.

This workshop follows the structure of the text book ‘Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks’ authored by Dr Ian Patrick and Anne Markiewicz. It will present a clear and staged conceptual model for the systematic development of an M&E Framework. It will examine a range of steps and techniques involved in the design and implementation of the framework; explore potential design issues and implementation barriers; cover the development of a Program Logic; the identification of key evaluation questions; the development of performance indicators; and identification of processes for data collection, on-going analysis and reflection based on data generated.

The facilitator will encourage interactive peer to peer dialogue to share experiences and learning, and also draw on case studies to encourage application of knowledge and skills to evaluation contexts.

Content

  • The importance and function of monitoring and evaluation processes
  • 'Table of Contents' for the development of an M&E Framework – what to do and in what order
  • Design of a viable M&E framework
  • Application of M&E frameworks to programs
  • Key challenges and barriers, and how to address them

Outcomes and Benefits

  • Understanding of an overall structure for the development of a M&E Framework
  • Identification of clear steps and stages involved in the process of development of an M&E Framework, and building knowledge and skills in their implementationanne markiewicz
  • Use of case studies to develop key components of an M&E Framework for an initiative
  • Understand how to best support participatory processes in design and implementation of an M&E Framework

Who should attend?
This workshop offers professionals from across government, universities and not for profit and consulting organisations foundation skills in planning for monitoring and evaluation of a program. You would benefit most from the workshop if you have some prior knowledge of evaluation, particularly program theory and program logic and some practical experience with evaluation activities.

About the facilitator: Anne Markiewicz
Anne Markiewicz is Director of Anne Markiewicz and Associates, a consultancy that specialises in developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks, and the delivering of training, mentoring and capacity building in monitoring and evaluation. Anne has been an evaluator for over 20 years and has been recognised by the Australasian Evaluation Society through receipt of two awards for excellence in evaluation. Anne has extensive experience in the design and implementation of monitoring and evaluation frameworks, integrating contemporary evaluation theory with the identification of good practice in monitoring and evaluation. Anne has diverse experience working in a wide range of sectors and contexts and has delivered this training program extensively in Australasia and in the USA and the UK.

Date and Time: Wednesday, 16 November 2016, 7:00pm onwards
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Presenter: Victorian AES Committee
Register by: Monday, 14 November 2016

This is a free event

This event will follow on from the  November seminar: Of Baselines and Bottom Lines Reflections from a Gender-Based Violence project in the Solomon Islands 

The Victorian AES Committee invites all who are attending the seminar and all Victorian members to the End of Year Celebration.  

Come and join us for drinks and nibbles, a chance to socialise, reflect on the year and perhaps share ideas for next year’s seminar program.

Please ensure you register for this event.

Date and Time: Wednesday, 16 November 2016, 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Presenter: Annalize Struwig, Principal Consultant, IOD PARC Australasia
Register by: Monday, 14 November 2016

Powerpoint Presentation

This is a free event

Ever conducted an evaluation and wished there was a baseline? How are baseline studies conducted? What goes into establishing a baseline? Is it worth it?

This interactive presentation aims to give attendees some insight into methodologies and practical considerations for conducting baseline studies, with particular insights from doing this in the Pacific. It is based on the presenter’s experience of leading the Monitoring and Evaluation of a three-year program to prevent family violence, which includes conducting baseline and endline studies.

This presentation will cover:

  • A brief background of the project and how the M&E works
  • Why a baseline study was necessary
  • The trials and tribulations of conducting a baseline study in the Pacific
  • How the baseline is being used
  • What we learnt from the baseline

Audience members will be provided with ample opportunity to ask questions.

Presenter:
Annalize Struwig is a passionate evaluation practitioner with a special interest in complex and complicated program evaluation. She has worked in international development for almost 20 years and her experience in programme design and evaluation spans 25 countries. As a principal consultant with IOD PARC Australasia, her work involves conducting evaluations of all kinds (evaluability assessments, inception reviews, progress reviews, meta-evaluations, final evaluations), as well as capacity development for results-focused management in programmes, teams and organisations. She serves on technical expert panels for Evaluation Quality Assurance for the World Food Programme and the UK Department for International Development, and has served in a similar capacity for UNICEF in the past.

Date and Time: Wednesday, 19 October 2016, 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Presenter: Maya Romic - Social Suite, Sarah Mason - Centre for Program Evaluation, University of Melbourne and Dr Zita Unger - ZIMAN
Register by: Friday 14 October 2016

This is a free event

Come to this session to learn how to use surveys well!

This session is designed in response to feedback from Victorian AES members that they’d like to learn about surveys. This session is on how to design, implement, analyse and report on surveys well.

The seminar will explore good survey design principles, how to use surveys along with other methods, and provide some tips on using surveys online and via phone technology.
As this is a broad topic, there will be a panel of three speakers to cover the areas of survey design; implementation; and analysis and reporting. Each speaker will draw examples from evaluations they’ve worked on.

Bring your questions about surveys. The evening will include time for breakout groups focused on practical problems.

Presenters:

Maya Romic works for Socialsuite, a technology platform that enables organisations to measure the impact of their programs and services. Through Socialsuite, organisations can collect real-time feedback from all stakeholders to assess the impact of their programs and services. Data collection is simplified using smartphones, tablets and cloud-based technology.

Sarah Mason is a Research Fellow and Project Manager based at the Centre for Program Evaluation. Sarah specializes in the design and implementation of high quality monitoring, reporting and evaluation products in complex and challenging environments. Over the past 10 years she has conducted research and evaluation projects across a wide range of international development contexts, including Afghanistan, East Timor, Myanmar, Thailand and Cambodia.

Dr Unger was founder and director of an evaluation consultancy firm that developed an online survey management system, which received the AES Evaluation Policy and Systems award. She is a Fellow of the AES and current interests are governance, evaluation and strategy.

Date and Time: Wednesday, 14 September 2016, 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Presenter: Georgia Dawson, Lecturer and Research Fellow, Centre for Program Evaluation
Register by: Monday, 12 September 2016

This is a free event

In 2013, MGSE developed a new assessment process for the selection of candidates into teacher education courses. As part of this process, MGSE introduced an online survey tool which assesses a range of cognitive and non-cognitive domains associated with successful completion of initial teacher education programs. The tool, initially called TeacherSelector, has been re-badged as the Teacher Capability Assessment Tool (TCAT) and brings a strong evidence-base to the selection and development of pre-service teachers. The TCAT instrument is based on current research of quality teaching and is designed to improve the selection of students into teacher education programs. To date, no other cohesive or comprehensive model, grounded in research, has been developed for pre-service teacher selection, although there are such models in other comparable occupations.

The seminar will provide an overview of the research underpinning the tool, its operation, validity and reliability. The session will also present current research into its effectiveness and how it is being used to inform course selection and course development at a number of universities within Australia and overseas. The presentation will also include a discussion of the development of a complementary tool, TEXCAT, which is designed to support the evaluation of the impact of teacher education courses and the readiness of graduates to teach.

Presenter:
Georgia Dawson, Lecturer and Research Fellow, Centre for Program Evaluation

Georgia is also a psychologist with experience in the primary and tertiary education sectors including psychological assessment of learning problems, psycho-educational interventions and counselling. Georgia has extensive skills in quantitative data analysis including item response theory, structural equation modelling and path analysis.

Her research interests include, prediction of performance through cognitive and non-cognitive variables, strategies that improve the classroom functioning of students, the influence of social/emotional factors on learning and the cognitive correlates of reading and reading development. She is currently completing her PhD in Educational Psychology, investigating the utility of mindfulness in improving learning outcomes.

 

Date: Thursday 10 November 2016, 9:00am to 5:00pm (registration at 8:30am)
Venue: Saxons Training Facilities, Level 6, 500 Collins Street, Melbourne Vic 3000
Presenters: Vanessa Hood and Natalie Moxham
Register by: Thursday 3 November 2016
Cost: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

About the workshop - Overview
Stakeholders are more likely to feel ownership of an evaluation and implement the recommendations if they participate throughout the process. Evaluators therefore need to make the most of every opportunity they have with their stakeholders to encourage participation. However, working with stakeholders is not always easy and can be one of the most challenging aspects of managing or conducting an evaluation. The solution to encouraging participation is to have strong facilitation and team building skills.

Facilitation is process focused and a collaborative way of working where the leader takes a neutral position and helps the group achieve their objective (e.g. to articulate a vision of success, make a decision or prioritise recommendations). Facilitative processes value the wisdom of the group and allow everyone to express their view. They enable people to connect with each other and to work effectively as a group. A facilitator actively listens and responds to the needs of the group. They communicate verbally and non-verbally and encourage the group to do this by using active processes. Facilitators are aware of their actions and values and understand how these influence the group. They tap into the hearts and minds of the group and help them understand underlying issues.

Content
Participants leave with practical facilitation skills they can use immediately.

Facilitation fundamentals:

  • Understanding the group - thinking and learning styles and personalities, diversity and difference, ensuring all voices are heard, dealing with conflicts
  • Understanding yourself - values and behaviour and how they affect the group
  • Understanding the facilitation process - developing a facilitation plan to achieve the group's objectives
  • Choosing and using the right facilitation tool for the situation - pros and cons

Introduction to participatory methods that require strong facilitation:

  • Participatory evaluation design including a shared vision of success
  • Most Significant Change for data collection and analysis
  • Group semi structured interviews and structured discussion methods
  • Participatory data analysis and reflection (e.g. in a summit workshop)
  • Building evaluative capacity of teams

Who should attend

Internal evaluators and external consultants, program managers and policy officers who:

  • conduct their own evaluations
  • manage or commission evaluations
  • design and manage evaluation capacity building projects
  • facilitate lessons learned sessions.

Presenters
Vanessa and Natalie are experienced facilitators and evaluators. They have used participatory approaches in their work and have trained other people in this area.

Vanessa Hood is a skilled facilitator and evaluator with over 15 years' experience in a range of contexts, particularly around behaviour change for sustainability. She works as a facilitator and evaluator with Rooftop Social and also has many years’ experience working in government organisations. Vanessa is passionate about working with people and uses a range of creative facilitation techniques to help participants engage deeply with technical content and, importantly, with each other. Vanessa delivers training, mentors others in evaluation and regularly facilitates group workshops with a range of government and non-government clients across Australia.

Natalie is a facilitator and consultant in organisational processes, participatory program design, monitoring and evaluation. She successfully designed and delivered training in facilitation, program design, monitoring and evaluation. Natalie's participatory approach uses strength based and engagement processes that build agency and collaboration with communities, networks, organisation and programs. Natalie lives on DjaDjaWurrung Country in central Victoria and has a long-term commitment and extensive experience working with Indigenous groups as well as in the Asia-Pacific region and Australia. She holds a master in international development and works across community, NGO and Government sectors.

Date and Time: Wednesday, 17 August 2016, 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Presenter: Dr Stefan Kaufman, EPA Victoria
Register by: Monday, 15 August 2016

This is a free event

This seminar presents an appreciative inquiry project that asked “When and why is science influential, credible and valued in environmental regulatory decision making?” In the process of providing an overview of the project and findings, seminar participants will be invited to reflect on and discuss the suitability of the methodology for the research questions and context, and the implications of the findings for the practice of evaluators and other researchers.

A seminal and enduring theme in research utilization literature has been the challenges and barriers that exist for getting insights FROM research IN to government decision making. But what is happening within the walls of agencies themselves? This project examined ‘what works’ for (dominantly) government staff using science in largely administrative environmental regulatory decision making, in order to learn how to encourage more of it . Forty two cases, in Victoria, Australia, and Florida, USA, were identified using an appreciative inquiry methodology. Participants identified exemplary cases and associated enablers. Cases included environmental problem solving, regulatory approvals, administrative appeals, and standard setting.

Presenter:
Stefan has been leading the social science function at EPA Victoria for over 9 years. He shares experience of working within a knowledge brokering model that aims to identify and flexibly meet organisational evidence needs, and which builds the associated internal capability, and external networks, partnerships and other arrangements required to make that work. He spends a lot of time trying to talk people out of doing online surveys, and enjoys working with colleagues to design, commission and/or deliver, and particularly utilize, diverse research projects for monitoring and evaluation, behaviour change and organisational performance measurement.

AES Evaluator’s Professional Domain of Competence: This session addresses competency 1: evaluative attitude and professional conduct.

For a copy of the Powerpoint please click here

Date and time: Monday, 1 August 2016 (moved from 20June), 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Saxons Training Facilities, Level 6, 500 Collins Street, Melbourne
Presenter: Dr Jess Dart, Founder Director, Clear Horizon Consulting Pty Ltd
Register online by: Wednesday 27 July 2016
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

The increasing move towards 'management by results' means there is an ever increasing pressure for agencies and organisations to be able to tell a clear and powerful results story. This pressure is building across many agencies in Australia, and in particular at the Commonwealth Government level with the introduction of the enhanced Commonwealth performance framework. With this has comes the request for "evidence-based performance stories".

This one-day workshop introduces the concept and method of performance story.

The term 'performance story' was introduced by John Mayne in a paper published in 2004. The encyclopaedia of evaluation defines a performance story as:

Essentially a short report about how a program contributed to outcomes. Although they may vary in content and format, most are short, mention program context and aims, relate to a plausible results chain, and are backed by empirical evidence (Dart and Mayne, 2005).

Performance story reports aim to strike a good balance between depth of information and brevity. They aim to be written in accessible language and help build a credible case about the contribution a program has made towards outcomes or targets. They help teams and organisations to focus on results and also provide a common language for discussing different programs.

This workshop will explore different approaches to performance story, and how performance story reports are developed. It will outline steps to building a report and explore the role of program logic and evidence in developing the report. It will be an interactive and engaging workshop involving case studies and group process.

Who should attend?
This workshop is aimed at anyone who is interested creating or commissioning a performance story at the project, program or organisational level. It caters for beginner to intermediate level. For those people who know of Jess Dart's work with the Most Significant Change technique (MSC) it is important to be clear that this workshop is not about MSC, but about an approach to reporting on results at a whole-of project or program level using multiple lines of evidence.

About the presenter
Jess Dart's professional interests are in evaluation methods, evaluation theory, collaborative approaches, and strategic planning. She has a PhD in program evaluation and an MSc in Sustainable Agriculture. Her doctoral research involved adapting and testing a story-based monitoring and evaluation tool named the 'Most Significant Change' technique (MSC). She went on to co-author the user-guide with Rick Davies. Jess is the founder of Clear Horizon Consulting a medium sized consulting company specialising in evaluation and strategy.
Jess has an extensive experience in performance story approaches. In 2008 to 2012 she championed the 'performance story reporting' pilot process with two divisions of the commonwealth government which led to over 20 performance story reports being written. She also developed a particular approach to documenting and creating performance stories named "Collaborative Outcome Reporting (COR).

Date and Time: Wednesday, 20 July 2016, 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Presenter: Vanessa Hood, Rooftop Social
Register by: Monday, 18 July 2016

This is a free event

Do you have a story about an evaluation that makes a difference? Can you identify what attributes of this work make it really valuable? Is it possible to distinguish the impact of the evaluation from the impact of the project itself? If you don’t have a story of your own, are you keen to hear inspirational stories from other fellow evaluators? If any of these questions intrigue you, then this session is for you!

‘Evaluations that make a difference: stories from around the world’ was a project funded by EvalPartners. It is a collection of 8 stories of evaluations that made a difference, not only from the perspective of the evaluator, but also from the commissioners and users. The project also looked at the factors that contribute to high quality evaluations that are used to improve programs’ and people’s lives. These stories were published during EvalYear 2015 and can be found at https://evaluationstories.wordpress.com/ in English, Spanish and French.

The session will focus on the lessons that emerged during the project about what makes an evaluation useful. Participants will be given the opportunity to consider how these lessons may inform their work.

Participants will also be encouraged to share their stories of evaluations that make a difference. The stories may come from work they have personally undertaken or evaluations completed by other people.

This will be an interactive workshop style session.

Presenter:
Vanessa Hood is a skilled facilitator and evaluator with over 15 years' experience in a range of contexts, particularly around behaviour change for sustainability. She works as a facilitator and evaluator with Rooftop Social and also has many years’ experience working in government organisations. Vanessa is passionate about working with people and uses a range of creative facilitation techniques to help participants engage deeply with technical content and, importantly, with each other.

AES Evaluator’s Professional Domain of Competence: This session addresses competency 1: evaluative attitude and professional conduct.

For a copy of the presentation click here 

For a copy of the document click here

Date and time: Thursday 14 and Friday 15 July 2106, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Jasper Hotel, 489 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne 3000
Register online by: Thursday 7 July 2016
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

About the workshop
Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Frameworks are becoming increasingly important for developing an agreed approach to the assessment of results achieved and to aid organisational learning. The M&E Framework identifies expected results, key evaluation questions and the means to answer these questions through routine monitoring and periodic evaluation. It also provides a guide to the implementation of M&E processes over the life of a program or other initiative. Monitoring and evaluation functions are essential to the effective operation of programs and will contribute to the overall value derived from them. M&E Frameworks should support decision-making, allocation of resources and program refinement based on lessons learned.

This workshop follows the structure of the text book ‘Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks’ authored by Dr Ian Patrick and Anne Markiewicz. It will present a clear and staged conceptual model for the systematic development of an M&E Framework. It will examine a range of steps and techniques involved in the design and implementation of the framework; explore potential design issues and implementation barriers; cover the development of a Program Logic; the identification of key evaluation questions; the development of performance indicators; and identification of processes for data collection, on-going analysis and reflection based on data generated.

The facilitator will encourage interactive peer to peer dialogue to share experiences and learning, and also draw on case studies to encourage application of knowledge and skills to evaluation contexts.

Content

  • The importance and function of monitoring and evaluation processes
  • 'Table of Contents' for the development of an M&E Framework – what to do and in what order
  • Design of a viable M&E framework
  • Application of M&E frameworks to programs
  • Key challenges and barriers, and how to address them

Outcomes and Benefits

  • Understanding of an overall structure for the development of a M&E Framework
  • Identification of clear steps and stages involved in the process of development of an M&E Framework, and building knowledge and skills in their implementation
  • Use of case studies to develop key components of an M&E Framework for an initiative
  • Understand how to best support participatory processes in design and implementation of an M&E Framework

Who should attend?
This workshop offers professionals from across government, universities and not for profit and consulting organisations foundation skills in planning for monitoring and evaluation of a program. You would benefit most from the workshop if you have some prior knowledge of evaluation, particularly program theory and program logic and some practical experience with evaluation activities.

About the facilitator: Ian Patrickipatrick 250
Dr. Ian Patrick is an independent consultant and Director of Ian Patrick and Associates. His career as an evaluator extends over around 20 years and includes a focus on both Australia and the Asia Pacific region. He has broad experience across different social sectors such as health, education, law and justice, community development, and human rights and Indigenous issues. Ian has worked with a range of organisations and programs in developing monitoring and evaluation systems, and conducted evaluation-related training programs including on Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks. Ian is an Honorary Senior Fellow, Development Studies Program at the University of Melbourne and was previously the leader of the evaluation practice area at the International NGO Training and Research Centre, UK.

Date and Time: Wednesday, 15 June 2016, 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Presenters: John Owen, Principal Fellow, Centre for Program Evaluation, University of Melbourne
Jessica Kenway, Director, Bluebird Consultants
Talya Mathews, Research, Evaluation and Analysis Manager, Royal Australian College of General Practitioners
Register by: Monday, 13 June 2016

This is a free event

Thinking about becoming an evaluator? Considering new or different career options? Not sure what skills you need or if you have “the right background”? Not sure what an evaluator actually does on a daily basis?
This seminar aims to give attendees an insight to what life is like as an evaluator working in different professional spheres: an academic institution, as an independent consultant and within a medical college. The panel members span those early in their evaluation journey to those with many years of experience.
This interactive panel discussion will cover:

  • The different pathways to become an evaluator
  • Daily activities, challenges and benefits of different types of evaluation roles
  • Areas of specialisation and methods that are commonly used
  • The skillsets evaluators need in different types of roles
  • Career highlights and aspirations
  • Opportunities and challenges in the field of evaluation

Audience members will be provided with ample opportunity to ask questions to the panel.

Presenters:
John Owen  is interested in providing useful evaluation based knowledge to policy and program decision makers. A feature of his recent activity has been to work with organizational leadership and management to use evaluation findings to improve the delivery of innovative programs, using the principle of strategic interactivity. This principle assumes that ongoing cooperation between evaluator and management increases the use of findings in decision-making. He is a regular contributor to journals and at international evaluation conferences in Australia and overseas. His book: Program Evaluation: Forms and Approaches provides an integrated framework to evaluation theory and practice that has had favourable reviews worldwide.

Jessica Kenway is a monitoring and evaluation specialist with over sixteen years’ experience in development programs in the Pacific, South-East Asia, South Asia, Africa and Australia. Jessica is the Director of Bluebird Consultants, which was selected for DFAT’s Aid Advisory Services Panel for the provision of design, evaluation and research services from 2013 to 2018. Jessica has served as a judge on the Australasian Evaluation Society's Award for Excellence Committee from 2012 onwards. Sectors of work have included women's leadership and economic empowerment, economic development and trade, community development, education, health, governance, democratic governance, rural development, natural resource management, law and justice reform, and humanitarian assistance.

For the past two years, Talya Mathews has worked at the RACGP, where she began as the RACGP in-house evaluation coordinator and is now the Education Department’s Research, Evaluation and Analysis Manager. Prior to this, she worked at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute for five years, initially as a researcher and then as an evaluator. In her previous career, she worked as an English language teacher in Japan for seven years. Talya has specialty interests in cross-cultural communication, languages and linguistics, international development, policy, education and psychology. She has degrees in Arts (politics and languages) and psychology.

Date and time: Monday 30 May 2016, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Saxons Melbourne Facility, Level 6, 500 Collins Street, Melbourne
Presenter: Dr Ian Patrick, Ian Patrick and Associates
Register online by: Monday, 23 May 2016
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Purpose of Workshop
The workshop will provide participants with insight into theory based approaches to evaluation, and specifically into the role of Program Theory and Program Logic to provide a clear understanding, focus and direction to the practice of evaluation. The use of Program Theory and Program Logic will be clearly detailed within a staged conceptual model, with guidance provided on how they can be applied within the planning and implementation of an evaluation.

Areas covered in the workshop include the use of Program Theory and Program Logic to:

• Identify the expected cause and effect relationships within a program, and the critical assumptions which underpin whether anticipated change occurs.
• Establish relationships between the more operational constructs of inputs, activities, outputs, outcomes, and impacts as they apply to a program
• Identify critical areas of focus for monitoring and evaluation including determining evaluation questions across different evaluation domains

The role of stakeholders in the development of the Program Theory and Program Logic and ways to promote their participation will be a point of emphasis. The workshop will consider how monitoring and evaluation activities can establish the validity of the Program Theory and Program Logic, and assist in making adjustments to these models as a program matures or understandings about its identity change. Constraints and limitations in the use of Program Theory and Program Logic will also be identified, together with common pitfalls in implementation and means to address these.

Teaching/Learning Strategies and Resources to be Used

The workshop will incorporate a mix of training methods including presentations, use of case studies, and small group interactive work. There will be ample opportunity for open discussion and questions.

Target group:

This workshop is pitched at an Intermediate level.

The workshop's worth

Theory based approaches to evaluation are increasingly recognised as having a core role in evaluation, and their use is seen as a means to resolve debates regarding choice of an appropriate evaluation methodology. The importance of a theory based approach is also reinforced within recent Australian government legislation and guidelines. The Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act (2013) and Resource Management Guide 131 'Developing Good Performance Information' (Department of Finance, April 2015) highlight the important place of logic models as representations of how a program's purpose will be met, the chain of reasoning that connects critical elements to that purpose, and the performance information needed to tell an effective 'performance story'. With a blend of conceptual material and practice, the workshop will position participants to make effective use of Program Theory and Program Logic. The workshop contents are also closely related to the recent SAGE publication, Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks, of which Ian Patrick is joint author.

About the Traineripatrick 250

Dr. Ian Patrick is a self-employed consultant undertaking evaluation related roles in both Australia and the Asia-Pacific region. Ian has considerable experience as a trainer and has delivered workshops in areas such as Developing M&E Frameworks, Introduction to M&E, Advanced M&E, Impact Assessment, and Participatory Evaluation. This experience crosses Australia, New Zealand, United States, UK, Ireland and a range of developing countries particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. Ian is an Honorary Senior Fellow with the School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Melbourne.

Date and time: Wednesday 18 May 2016, 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Topic: How to deal with squeaky wheels: Evaluating community engagement
Presenter: Jess Dart, Clear Horizon Consulting
Venue: VicHealth, Ground Floor, 15-31 Pelham St, Carlton, Victoria, 3053
RSVP by: Monday 16 May 2016

This is a free event

Increasingly, public and private sector organisations are seeing the importance of reaching out to communities to engage, consult and collaborate on policy, programs and other decisions. Engagement is a pivotal part of many programs. It is important that evaluation pays attention to the engagement processes when this is the case. This seminar will explore the unique dilemmas of evaluating engagement and help participants explore solutions for these dilemmas.

While the logic of evaluating engagement is entirely consistent with that of program evaluation more broadly, there are some unique challenges, including:

  • engagement approaches cover a wide range of activities and need a wide range of evaluation approaches
  • the influence of dominant personalities, power structures and relationships
  • the challenges around evaluating relationship capital that may extend beyond program timeframes.

The seminar will offer some practical steps, as well as a set of principles, for evaluating engagement processes.

Jess Dart
Jess Dart's professional interests are in evaluation methods, evaluation theory, collaborative approaches, and strategic planning. She has a PhD in program evaluation and an MSc in Sustainable Agriculture. Her doctoral research involved adapting and testing a story-based monitoring and evaluation tool named the 'Most Significant Change' technique (MSC). She went on to co-author the user-guide with Rick Davies. Jess is the founder of Clear Horizon Consulting a medium sized consulting company specialising in evaluation and strategy.

For a copy of the powerpoint presentation click here

Date and time: Monday 9 and Tuesday 10 May 2016, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Jasper Hotel, 489 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne 3000
Presenter: David Roberts
Register online by: Wednesday 4  May 2016
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

Purpose of Workshop

This two day workshop has been developed to provide an introductory insight into the strengths and weaknesses of a broad range of qualitative methods of data collection and analysis. Participants will develop a conceptual model for the use of qualitative methods and gain basic skills in several key qualitative techniques through hands-on exercises.  

For commissioners of evaluation this workshop will provide an understanding of a range of qualitative methods allowing you to assess evaluation quality.  For evaluators, this workshop will provide a range of methods that will provide flexibility to adapt your evaluation to the evaluation questions and to triangulate data from different methods.

The workshop is interactive engaging participants in exercise and discussion with some role play.  Participants can also provide projects or issues they would like to work on during the two days.

The areas covered in the workshop will include a selection from:

  • role of qualitative methods in evaluation
  • ethics
  • observation
  • elicitation techniques
  • qualitative sampling
  • in-depth interviews
  • discussion groups and focus groups
  • analytical methods

Learning outcome

Participants will develop a conceptual model for the use of qualitative methods and gain basic skills in several key qualitative techniques through hands-on exercises.

Who should attend

Evaluators and commissioners of evaluation who wish to develop their skills and understanding of a range of qualitative methods. The workshop is pitched at the introductory to intermediate level.

Participants with interests in a developing their skills in a specific method might wish to consider Intermediate level workshops.

About the Facilitator

David Roberts is a self-employed consultant with wide experience in qualitative and quantitative methods. He was Chair of the AES Awards Committee for three years. David has training in Anthropology, Evaluation and Community Development. He has been conducting workshops for over 30 years in areas such as Participatory Research, Evaluation Design, Elicitation Techniques, Qualitative Methods and Program Theory.

Date and time: Wednesday 20 April 2016, 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Topic: The role of evaluation in designing and implementing new approaches to service delivery
Presenter: Kaye Stevens, RMIT University
Venue: VicHealth, Ground Floor, 15-31 Pelham St, Carlton, Victoria, 3053
RSVP by Monday 18 April 2016

This is a free event

This seminar draws on the experience of implementing and evaluating a three and a-half year action research project conducted in collaboration with Centrelink and a community with high levels of income support payments and socio economic disadvantage. The aim of the project was to develop new approaches to service delivery to interrupt cycles of disadvantage. The research approaches were participatory, evidence-based, realist, informed by theory and used co-design processes to develop new service delivery initiatives.

The evaluators’ role was to facilitate a process that enabled all stakeholders to build a shared understanding based on credible evidence from multiple sources. This involved developing and sustaining multiple relationships and building trust and credibility through research and evaluation processes. Evaluative processes embedded in the co-design approach enabled the perspectives and assumptions of diverse stakeholders to contribute to initial theories of change. Assumptions about both the nature of the problem and the theories of change were explicitly discussed and tested during the development of specific initiatives.

Kaye is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Applied Social Research, RMIT University. She has been working in the evaluation field for over ten years and has been involved in local, state and national evaluations of a range of human service programs and strategies. Prior to this Kaye worked in the community sector in a variety of roles that included agency management, direct service provision, advocacy, research, networking, policy development, community consultations, service system development and evaluation.

Date and time: Wednesday 16 March 2016, 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Topic: From evaluation theory to tests of evaluation theory?
Presenter: Brad Astbury, Lecturer, Centre for Program Evaluation, The University of Melbourne
Venue: VicHealth, Ground Floor, 15-31 Pelham St, Carlton, Victoria, 3053
RSVP by Tuesday 15 March 2016

This is a free event

Evaluation is a booming business. Each year the number of ‘new’ approaches, models, frameworks, and toolkits grows exponentially. There seems to be no shortage of opinions regarding how one ought to conduct evaluation. A driving adage seems to be ‘let a thousand flowers bloom’. Innovation is important, and should be encouraged. Yet, the vast majority of prescriptions regarding evaluation practice have not been substantiated. In this presentation I consider the theme of ‘research on evaluation’ and provide an overview of past and present literature on the topic. A variety of potentially fruitful ways to ‘test’ evaluation theory are discussed, in the hope that this will encourage greater efforts to reflect an evaluative gaze back on evaluation itself.

Presenter:
Brad Astbury is a lecturer at the University of Melbourne, Centre for Program Evaluation (CPE), where he teaches introductory and advanced evaluation theory and methodology subjects within the Masters of Evaluation. This specialised course has been running for two decades and is the only program of its kind in Australasia. He is also a Senior Research Fellow at Deakin University, Population Health Strategic Research Centre (SRC), Faculty of Health.

Brad has 15 years of experience in evaluating programs, mainly in the area of criminal justice, health, education and agricultural-extension. Brad is co-author of three books, many journal articles and book chapters and numerous commissioned reports. Recent publications have appeared in the American Journal of Evaluation, Evaluation, Interdisciplinary Journal of Social Sciences, and Advances in Program Evaluation book series.

His main areas of interest are evaluation theory, social research methdology, and impact evaluation.

Date and time: Wednesday 17 February 2016, 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Topic: Developing monitoring and evaluation frameworks
Presenter: Ian Patrick, Ian Patrick & Associates
Venue: VicHealth, Ground Floor, 15-31 Pelham St, Carlton, Victoria, 3053
RSVP by Tuesday 16 February 2016

This is a free event

Many of us who are involved in evaluation, whether through practice, research or management, have heard the critique that programs are often operated with a strong focus on monitoring, but with a neglect of evaluation. Courtesy of monitoring, those who operate programs tend to know more about what the program does, and the extent of some of the changes that are associated with it. Beyond this, things may be less known. Areas typically illuminated by evaluation such as the acceptability and significance of what is done, and why change does or doesn't occur may remain relatively unexplored. Where both monitoring and evaluation are conducted, the two functions and their results are often poorly integrated, to the detriment of the assessment of program performance.

The use of an effective Monitoring and Evaluation Framework is a significant means to avoid such constraints. Developed upfront, a Monitoring and Evaluation Framework provides a plan to promote the necessary and coordinated use of the two functions. This seminar will explore the rationale for the use of a Monitoring and Evaluation Framework, its conceptual basis, its key features and how it may best be used in practice. The seminar draws on the recent text, Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks (SAGE, 2015) of which Ian Patrick is joint author, together with Anne Markiewicz. The key principles of the framework used such as being evaluation-led, participatory and results orientated are discussed, and the means by which they are promoted identified. Overall, the seminar will highlight the value of use of a Monitoring and Evaluation Framework and the staged and transparent process by which it may be developed and applied with stakeholders. There will be opportunities for both discussion and sharing of experience with participants at the seminar.

Presenter:
Dr. Ian Patrick is an independent consultant and Director of Ian Patrick and Associates. His career as an evaluator extends over around 20 years and includes a focus on both Australia and the Asia Pacific region. He has broad experience across different social sectors such as health, education, law and justice, community development, and human rights and Indigenous issues. Ian has worked with a range of organisations and programs in developing monitoring and evaluation systems, and conducted evaluation-related training programs including on Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks. Ian is an Honorary Senior Fellow, Development Studies Program at the University of Melbourne and was previously the leader of the evaluation practice area at the International NGO Training and Research Centre, UK.

For a copy of the presentation click here

For a copy of the summary click here

Date and Time: Thursday 11 February 2016, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Urbis, 120 Collins Street, Melbourne 
Presenters: Duncan Rintoul and Vanessa Hood
Register by: Monday 8 February 2016
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student members $220, Student non-members $302.50

About the workshop
This one-day course has been custom designed for people who want to commission better evaluations. It is for people with a role in planning, commissioning and managing evaluations. It is suitable for beginners through to those with a few years' experience who want to gain knowledge and consolidate their understanding of:
• different types of evaluation and how they can be used to inform policy, strategy and project work
• principles and steps in successfully planning and implementing an evaluation project
• techniques for developing and prioritising your evaluation questions
• effective strategies for stakeholder engagement in the evaluation process
• elements that make up a good evaluation brief / approach to market
• factors that influence the scale, budget and timeframe of an evaluation
• what to look for in an external evaluation team
• assessment of evaluation proposals and the procurement process
• management of evaluation consultancies
• ethical conduct, governance and risk management in evaluation.

The training is interactive and hands-on, with lots of practical examples and group activities through the day to keep the blood pumping and the brain ticking. It will provide you with tools that you can start using immediately.

Who should attend?
Anyone working in government, the community sector or business who has a role in planning, commissioning or managing evaluations. No prior experience in evaluation is required.

The course is limited to 20 participants. If the course books out, it will be run again.

About the presentersrintoul

Duncan Rintoul is a member of the AES Board with over 15 years' research and evaluation experience across a broad range of policy areas, organisational contexts and methodologies. His working week is currently split between the NSW Department of Education (where he is a Principal Evaluator in the Centre for Education Statistics and Evaluation) and writing up his PhD at the University of Wollongong (on questionnaire design for the web). He has also worked extensively in evaluation consultancy, and was on the Urbis team that won the AES Award for Evaluation Project of the Year in 2011. Duncan runs popular introductory courses in evaluation for the AES and the Australian Market and Social Research Society, and has also developed internal training programs for state and commonwealth government agencies with portfolios ranging from road safety and industry through to child protection and disability.

V Hood April 2011

Vanessa Hood is a skilled evaluator and facilitator with over 15 years' experience in a range of settings, particularly around behaviour change for sustainability. Vanessa is passionate about working with people and uses a range of creative facilitation techniques to help participants engage deeply with technical content and, importantly, with each other. Most of her experience has been in the Victorian government, where she has a lead role in building capability for evaluative thinking in a large agency. There she regularly delivers structured training, coaching and mentoring in evaluation for her colleagues, has established evaluation and outcome-focused approaches to embed reflective practice at all levels of the business, and has conducted numerous internal evaluations at project and strategic organisational level. Vanessa also works part time as a consultant and facilitator at Rooftop Social, with Duncan.

Date and time: Wednesday 18 November 2015, 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Topic: Lessons from a national longitudinal evaluation of Indigenous education
Presenters: Deborah Rhodes, Martin Pritchard and Dr James Scambary
Venue: VicHealth, Ground Floor, 15-31 Pelham St, Carlton, Victoria, 3053
RSVP by Tuesday 17 November 2015

Evaluators are surrounded by, and work within, a multiplicity of values, including cultural perspectives. These perspectives are embedded within the evaluand, the context within which an evaluand exists, and within the evaluation commissioners and stakeholders themselves. The challenge for the evaluator is to be cognisant of, and responsive to, such perspectives.

The AES Evaluators' Professional Learning Competency Framework (Domain 3) encourages evaluators to identify and apply appropriate cultural protocols by: having cultural expertise on the evaluation team; applying standards that are sensitive to cultural context(s); using culturally-appropriate methods for consultation, engagement, processes and reporting; seeking dispensation for any departure of processes from cultural norms; and understanding and articulating the potential and limitations of the evaluation within the cultural context(s).

This seminar is an opportunity to learn from and engage with 3 evaluators with extensive cross-cultural experience.

About the presenters
Deborah Rhodes is an independent consultant and trainer in development cooperation, specialising in approaches which contribute to capacity in different cultural contexts. She has worked on a wide variety of aid and development activities in Asian and Pacific countries. She trains development practitioners on topics such as cross-cultural approaches, participatory development, design and M&E. Deborah has published two books: Practitioners' Handbook for Capacity Development: A Cross-Cultural Approach (2013) is used widely by Australian NGOs; and Capacity Across Cultures: Global Lessons from Pacific Experiences (2014) is included in university courses and used by practitioners working in the Asia Pacific region.

Martin Pritchard has worked in information technology, been an active volunteer with environmental and social justice campaigns and lived and worked in Tonga. After working at the National Centre for Sustainability at Swinburne University he co-founded Pacific Research and Evaluation Associates co-creating the Evaluation Toolbox website and conducting project evaluation work in Australia and the Pacific region with special interest in development issues and climate change adaptation in Small Island Developing States. In addition to on-ground evaluation work, the team also specialise in delivering training in M&E and project design.

Dr James Scambary is a research consultant with the Asia Foundation and a Visiting Fellow at the State, Society and Governance in Melanesia Program at ANU. James worked as a trainer in media development in Timor-Leste between 2003 & 2006. Since then, James has conducted research and evaluations on a variety of themes surrounding conflict, peacebuilding, governance and organised crime in Timor-Leste for a range of agencies including the New York Social Science Research Council, DFAT and the World Bank. His recent monitoring and evaluation projects have included a mid-term and final evaluation of the Catholic Relief Services' two year urban peacebuilding project, and the Asia Foundation's four year State/Society Relations project, both in Timor-Leste.

For a copy of the PowerPoint presentation please click here

World Vision, Oxfam Australia, AES proudly presents

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image003Date and Time: Wednesday 18 November 2015, from 2:00pm to 4:30pm
Venue: Conference Room, Ground Floor Oxfam Australia, 132 Leicester Street, Carlton VIC 3053
Presenters: Di Kilsby, Independent Consultant, Tracey McDiarmid, World Vision Australia, Dr Deborah Western, Monash University
Register online by 13 November 2015

Making significant gender equality gains is often based on the foundation of changed gender norms and attitudes. But how do we evaluate these changes? This seminar from the Evaluation Capacity Building Initiative will address the challenges of describing and evaluating gender norms and suggest ways forward (i.e. practical tools!!). This event is supported by World Vision and Oxfam Australia in collaboration with the Australasian Evaluation Society.

 

Date and time: 21 October 2015, 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Topic: Lessons from a national longitudinal evaluation of Indigenous education
Presenter: Charlie Tulloch, Associate Director, KPMG
Venue: VicHealth, Ground Floor, 15-31 Pelham St, Carlton, Victoria, 3053
RSVP by 20 October 2015

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan 2010-2014 (Action Plan) promoted delivery of 55 actions to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students across Australia. The Plan sought to drive activity across the government, Catholic and independent school systems.

The need for an evaluation was embedded in the Action Plan, with ACIL Allen Consulting partnering with PhillipsKPA and Professor Mark Rose from Deakin University to complete a three year longitudinal evaluation that focused on assessing implementation and outcomes. Findings are being used to inform future national priorities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student education.

This presentation will outline the process used to evaluate a complex multi-initiative national policy over a three year period. Charlie will share 10 key lessons that will be of relevance and interest both to those working in Indigenous education and to evaluators generally.

About Charlie Tulloch
Charlie has worked as an evaluator for over seven years in professional services consulting companies. He completed a Masters of Evaluation at the University of Melbourne between 2012 and 2014. In August 2015, Charlie joined KPMG's Policy, Programs and Evaluation (PP&E) practice in Melbourne. Prior to this, Charlie worked at ACIL Allen Consulting (formerly the Allen Consulting Group) from 2010-2015. He works predominantly on evaluations. His other major consulting projects include: an organisation review of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS); review of coordination and engagement in delivery of the Northern Territory Emergency Response (NTER); and a national review of the Indigenous family violence prevention legal service (FVPLS). Charlie worked in the Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet from 2004-2008.

This seminar addresses AES Learning Competencies: 3. Culture, stakeholders and context; and 4. Research methods and systematic inquiry.

For a copy of the powerpoint presentation click here

Date and Time: Wednesday 16 September 2015, 5:30 pm to 7pm.
Topic: A practical approach to evaluating the Value for Money of development program
Presenter: Michelle Besley, Independent Consultant
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton Victoria 3053
Register online by: 15 September 2015
Fee: no charge

Increasingly, organisations are required to demonstrate the Value for Money of the programs which they implement. Such expectations impact on public, private and non-government organisations. For international development initiatives, pressures to show value for money are pronounced. As a consequence, Value for Money is becoming a standard component of evaluation wherein evaluators are expected to develop expertise in applying Value for Money concepts and approaches. There is an increasing need for organisations and evaluators to define and assess the central elements of Value for Money within an established framework. This is a relatively new area, with different organisations trialling different theoretical frameworks such as Social Return on Investment, the Basic Efficiency Resource, forms of Cost-Benefit Analysis, and other experimental methodologies.

The international development context provides heightened challenges for evaluation of Value for Money where development organisations support longer term programs that aim to bring about less tangible results such as changes in attitude and empowerment. This presentation will share an example of how such challenges can be addressed. It will draw on a case study from the presenter's experience. This involved the identification of a conceptual framework and a tool that was applied to evaluate Value for Money of a development program supported by a non-government organisation.

This session will explore the:
• Notion of Value for Money and its implications for the evaluator
• Criteria that can be used in the evaluation of Value for Money
• Different types of data that are needed to make a Value for Money assessment
• Impact of a heightened focus on Value for Money for the overall practice of evaluation

Presenter:

Michelle Besley is an independent Australia-based consultant specialising in design, and monitoring and evaluation. Michelle previously worked at Oxfam Australia in the Program Quality Unit. Prior to this, she was based in the Middle East for 7 years where she worked for national and international development agencies. In 2014, Michelle was engaged by an Australian NGO to develop a practical tool to assess the Value for Money of a development program. In 2015, she worked with staff and partners across three different programs to test, refine and strengthen this tool.

For a copy of the presentation click here

Date and Time: Wednesday 19 August 2015, 5:30 pm to 7pm.
Topic: Does the Victorian government need an evaluation community of interest?
Panel Members: Bronwen McDonald (Independent evaluator), Julie McGeary (Specialist Evaluation, DEDJTR), (TBC)Jess Dart (Managing Director, Clear Horizons), (TBC)Kirsty Fenton (Indigo Consulting)
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton Victoria 3053
Register online by: 18 August 2015
Fee: no charge

Evidence based policy and public sector performance and accountability remain central discussions about the Victorian public service. Many departments resource evaluation roles and teams, and there are numerous professional consultants and academics able to assist with evaluations. The AES offers seminars, a conference and training, as do many evaluation research and training companies. However, there isn't (currently) an active whole of Victorian Government evaluation network. During the late 1990s throughout the 2000s, such a network grew and developed to enable over 200 members to increase the evaluation culture, share organisational learning, and further build capability in Victorian Government organisations. This seminar brings together the thoughts and experiences of four people centrally involved in the life cycle of the Victorian Government community of interest for evaluation. They will share reflections on the history and format of the former community of interest, why it was important to them, what it required to thrive, and what its particular strengths were. Looking forward, we will ask 'does the Victorian Government need an evaluation community of interest?' and 'starting anew, what are the essential features for it to thrive? This seminar aims to be of relevance not just to government evaluators, but also the broader community of evaluators in Victoria who work with and support them.

World Vision, Oxfam Australia, AES proudly presents

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image003Date and Time: Monday, 3 August 2015, from 2:00pm to 4:30pm
Venue: Conference Room, Ground Floor Oxfam Australia, 132 Leicester Street, Carlton VIC 3053
Presenters: Jayne Pilkinton, Oxfam Australia and Keren Winterford, Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS
Register online by 29 July 2015 

NGOs program strategies increasingly include advocacy in order to secure more sustainable, widespread change, however the evaluation of advocacy is an emerging field still lacking a strong conceptual basis and recognised methodologies for assessing change pathways. This seminar from the Evaluation Capacity Building Initiative will address these challenges of evaluating advocacy and suggest ways forward (i.e. practical solutions!!).  

 

Date and time: Friday, 17 July 2015. 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Saxons Training Facilities, Level 8, 500 Collins Street, Melbourne
Presenter: Dr John Gargani, Founder of Gargani + Company, Inc.  
Register online by: 16 July 2015
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Social return on investment (SROI) is a new and controversial evaluation method. It is widely applied in the UK, Europe, and many international development settings. Demand for it in the US is rapidly growing. What is SROI? It is one application of valuation, representing the value stakeholders place on program impacts in monetary units. Specifically, SROI compares the value of impacts to the cost of producing them. It is strongly associated with social enterprise, impact investing, social impact bonds, value-for-money initiatives, and other efforts that combine business thinking with social betterment. In this hands-on workshop, you will learn the basics of how to conduct an SROI analysis. We will approach the method with a critical eye in order to plan, use, and interpret SROI effectively. You will leave the workshop with a better understanding of how to incorporate SROI into your practice, and how to engage clients and stakeholders in its implementation.

Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• interpret an SROI ratio
• understand how to estimate SROI ratios
• consider the strengths and weaknesses of SROI and how SROI applies to their work
• bring greater critical thinking to the interpretation of SROI reports
• use SROI to give voice to diverse stakeholder groups
• use SROI more effectively for funding decisions

About the presentergargani 13RT small-150x150
Dr John Gargani

John Gargani was recently elected the 2016 President of the American Evaluation Association.

He is President and Founder of Gargani + Company, Inc., a program design and evaluation firm located in Berkeley, California. Alongside supporting non-profit organizations, foundations, corporations, and government agencies achieve their social missions, John regularly writes about evaluation, shares his thoughts on at EvalBlog.com, teaches graduate classes on social entrepreneurship and program design, speaks at conferences around the world, and conducts workshops to train the next generation of evaluators.

Over the past 20 years, his work has taken him to diverse settings, including public housing projects, museums, countries adopting free market economies, and 19th century sailing ships. He has designed innovative social enterprises; directed large-scale randomized trials; and created novel technologies that measure how people think.

John holds three graduate degrees—a Ph.D. in Education from the University of California at Berkeley, where he studied measurement and evaluation; an M.S. in Statistics from New York University's Stern School of Business; and an M.B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business.

 

Date and Time: Wednesday 15th July 2015, from 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Presenters: Vanessa Hood, Helga Svendsen and Viv McWaters
Register online by 14th July 2015 

With evaluation being squeezed for time and resources in projects, it's even more important to maximise the use of people's time and to involve them in evaluation activities as a part of the project itself. That's easier said than done, especially if your experience of facilitation and participatory methods extends not much further than leading a focus group.

In this interactive session, three experienced facilitators will demonstrate a range of participatory activities. These activities can be used to collect evaluation data at any time during a project cycle.

When using facilitated approaches, participants engage more fully with the content and with each other. This allows individuals to contribute fully and also become more aware of others' responses.

Human nature and group dynamics can work against both quality and inclusiveness when collecting evaluation data from groups. Quality facilitation helps to overcome these issues by encouraging everyone to participate and have a say, exploring beyond surface level responses, being adaptable and flexible, and enabling the collection of a lot of data in a short amount of time.

About the presenters

Vanessa Hood
Vanessa Hood is the Evaluation Lead at Sustainability Victoria (SV). In her role she regularly uses her facilitation skills to run workshops and to coach staff in evaluation. She also leads the evaluation of the organisation's three year strategy. Vanessa has over 15 years' experience working with the Victorian government and, more recently, as an independent facilitator. She loves exploring creative ways of engaging with people in group and individual settings, including using applied improvisation.

Helga Svendsen
Helga is a connector: ideas to strategy; strategy to plans; plans to action; people to opportunities. She is passionate about empowerment, wise decision-making and connecting talk to action. She revels in assisting individuals and organisations to be clear on their role and plan to make the world a better place. She runs her own consultancy business specialising in strategy and planning, stakeholder engagement, and governance. Building on her extensive leadership roles in government, not-for-profit and membership organisations, Helga is a dynamic facilitator, a supportive and challenging coach, an effective trainer and an engaging speaker.

Viv McWaters
Viv, founder of Beyond the Edge, and co-founder of Creative Facilitation, specialises in group facilitation that breaks patterns and habits, and draws on her background in the natural sciences and the arts. Most recently her work has been focused on disaster risk reduction, emergency response, and participatory development – within communities and organisations – building resilience and capacity. Working in over 35 different countries has fuelled her passion for bird watching and street art!

Date and Time: Wednesday 17th June 2015, from 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15‐31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Presenter:Liz Gillies, Research Fellow, Asia Pacific Social Impact Centre, Melbourne Business School
Register online by 16th June 2015 

Increasingly not-for-profits, government, communities and business are jointly developing and implementing initiatives that address a broad range of socially intractable problems across the community. These initiatives are often systemic and aim to address the root causes of complex issues. They operate within adaptive and dynamic environments and are therefore not well suited to linear approaches to change.
Comprehensively tackling intractable problems brings together multiple and diverse actors, often with overlapping boundaries. Increasingly these programs are being delivered through new forms of partnership and collaboration, and there is increasing interest in learning how to best broker, build and assess the strength of these relationships.

In this session we will explore:
• What are the implications for evaluative frameworks within the context of this work?
• What role can or should evaluation play in these initiatives?
• How can evaluators help social innovators conceptualise their intervention in a way that supports their work in the development phase and is still useful to guide evaluation efforts?

This seminar, led by Liz Gillies, Research Fellow, Asia Pacific Social Impact Centre, Melbourne Business School will consider the role of evaluation in the social impact agenda, particularly from the perspective of the not-for-profit and philanthropic sectors. The seminar will explore the role of new partnerships in complex and adaptive systems, the role that evaluation can and should play in this important work and the increasing appetite for evaluative frameworks to strengthen the partnerships and collaborations that sit at the centre of such initiatives.

For a copy of the presentation please click here

Date and Time: Wednesday 20 May 2015, from 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15-31 Pelham Street, Carlton South VIC 3053
Presenters: Judy Lockie & Kari Sann
Register online by: 18 May 2015
Fee: No Charge

Reflective practice is an inquiry approach that involves a personal commitment to continuous learning and improvement. It is a deliberate pause to assume an open perspective, to allow for higher-level thinking processes. Reflective practice encourages the practitioner to examine their beliefs, goals, and practices, to gain new or deeper understandings resulting in actions designed to improve practice and ultimately, outcomes for clients, patients or beneficiaries. Reflective practices have long been used in clinical and professional learning environments as an important source of professional development and learning.

On the journey of becoming a competent evaluator, it is useful for us to take the time to critically reflect on our own practice, what we're learning and how we can improve. Evaluators work in a variety of environments. For those who are consultants, this commonly means working alone or in small (sometimes new) teams, quickly understanding and adapting to a new operating context, while collecting, analysing and making sense of complex, and sometimes conflicting, information in short timeframes. We celebrate when evaluations go well and provide guidance for organisations to forge their future directions, but there are also times when challenges arise. We can learn from both experiences.

In this session we will look at the guiding principles of reflective practice, and provide an insight into how it has been applied in a clinical setting (audiology). We will also look at the challenges to the practitioner and consider how to encourage a reflective disposition. We will then explore how reflective practice can be applied in evaluation practice, using a simple tool called After Action Reviews. This takes us through a frank, open and honest reflection to develop insight about what happened and what can be learned from an evaluation. We'll also explore how reflective practice principles can be useful to inform monitoring and evaluation methods.

About the presenters:

Judy Lockie is an audiologist and health professional educator with 40 years' experience as an academic and clinical teacher. She teaches reflective practice to students in the Master of Audiology program at the University of Melbourne, as part of professionalism and ethics.

Kari Sann has worked in monitoring and evaluation for 15 years. She is currently a consultant, and previously worked in government and not-for-profit sectors. Kari uses reflective practice approaches with a network of colleagues to critically look at her own work. She also draws on the principles of reflective practices to inform monitoring and evaluation methods for a variety of clients in international development and the Victorian public sector.

AES Competency 1: Self-evaluative attitude and professional practice

Date and time: Wednesday 15 April 2015, from 5:30 to 7:00 pm
Presenter: Dr Wei Leng Kwok
Venue: VicHealth Seminar Room, Ground Floor, 15-31 Pelham Street, Carlton South
Registration Online by: 10 April 2015

Event Description: In Victoria, and elsewhere in Australia and the world, violence against women is a problem of great magnitude with serious physical, psychological and emotional consequences to those experiencing it. Current estimates are that one in three Australian women have experienced physical violence since the age of 15. And one in five have experienced sexual violence since the age of 15. Most violence against women is perpetrated by men who are known to them: a current or former intimate partner. For Victorian women aged 15–44 years, intimate partner violence has been found to be the leading contributor to death, disability and illness, outstripping other known contributors. In 2009, the estimated annual cost of violence against women to the Victorian economy was around $3.4 billion.

Over the last few years, ground-breaking efforts have been made in Victoria to turn the tide of violence against women by taking steps to prevent such violence before it occurs, also known as primary prevention. Primary prevention works by tackling the underlying causes of the problem so it can't happen in the first place. These causes are gender inequality and gender roles/norms that grant unequal access to power and resources between women and men. Central to efforts in this area has been a research- and evidence-informed framework for action, Preventing Violence before it Occurs: A framework and background paper to guide the primary prevention of violence against women in Victoria, published by the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation (VicHealth) in 2007.

This seminar will give participants an opportunity to hear about VicHealth's framework for action and the Victorian initiatives supported by it, particularly through VicHealth's 'Respect, Responsibility and Equality' program. The seminar will also provide participants with an opportunity to hear about an evaluation approach that was developed as an integral part of VicHealth's programming. Participants will be given a first-hand account of this approach, which had practitioner utility in mind, was deeply participatory in its execution, centred on evaluation capacity building strategies that catered to the learning needs of stakeholders, and was aligned with the processes and goals of primary prevention. The seminar will provide copies of, or links to, various resources arising from VicHealth's programming, and there will be plenty of opportunity to discuss the primary prevention initiatives and the evaluation approach that accompanied them.

This seminar is for those who want to hear more about preventing violence against women initiatives and/or participatory and learning-oriented evaluation.

Dr Wei Leng Kwok is an experienced social researcher who works in the community and health sectors and has run her own consultancy business, WLK Consulting, since 2007. Wei Leng is also the Research Practice Leader for Preventing Violence against Women at VicHealth, a role she has held since 2010. It is in this role that she developed and refined the participatory and learning-oriented approach to evaluating Victorian primary prevention initiatives that will be the focus of the seminar.

World Vision, Oxfam Australia, AES proudly presents

Date and Time: Wednesday 18th March 2015, from 2:00pm to 4:30pm
Venue: Conference Room, Ground Floor Oxfam Australia, 132 Leicester Street, Carlton VIC 3053
Presenters:Meghan Cooper, ACFID Anne Markiewicz, Anne Markiewicz and Associates
And a representative from Save the Children
Register online by 13th March 2015 

oxfamNGOs care about ethics. This is reflected in values and principles which typically guide organisational charters and program strategies. Commitments to values such as respect for people and promoting equity are commonly identified. Putting such ethical principles into practice involves a range of challenges, as exemplified in the field of evaluation. Evaluation demands much of stakeholders in terms of contribution of ideas, perspectives and aspirations. But without ethics guidance the process can do significant harm, while also putting at risk the reliability and usability of results. Moreover, for NGOs World Visionimplementing systematic and practical approaches to ethics in evaluation can be challenging.

Our first seminar for 2015 focuses on these issues, representing the continuation of the seminar series supported by the Australasian Evaluation Society, and International NGOs (INGOs). A range of experienced practitioners will present their perspectives on the role of ethics in evaluation; provide insight to the guidelines and approaches used by evaluation societies (such as the AES) and NGOs to promote ethical approaches to evaluation; and also highlight practical examples and issues involved in their application

The seminar will involve presentation and plenty of opportunity for interaction, group work and discussion. Refreshments and an opportunity to network informally will follow the seminar.

An Invitation to AES Members

Date and Time: Friday 20th February commencing 12:30 pm
Venue: Theatre Q227, Level 2, Melbourne Graduate School of Education, 234 Queensberry Street, Carlton, Vic 3053
As a light lunch will be provided please register online by 13 February.

A Special General Meeting of Members will be held prior to a Presentation and Q & A Session with the Board of the Australasian Evaluation Society. This is a great opportunity to meet the Board of the AES and hear Dr Lyn Alderman, our AES President speak on current issues of interest to our AES members.

This will also be an opportunity to raise issues with the Board on topics of interest to yourself and getting some sense of where the Board is heading during this year of evaluation. EvalYear has identified four themes which will be discussed during 2015. The Board's response to these four themes could be one of the discussion points. These themes are:

  • Identifying the key future priorities for the global evaluation community to launch the 2016-2020 Global Evaluation Agenda;
  • Bridging the gap between the evaluation community (supply side) and the policy makers community (demand side), including Parliamentarians, to ensure good quality, equity-focused and gender-responsive evaluations are demanded and used in policy making;
  • Mainstreaming equity-focused and gender-responsive evaluations in Sustainable Development Goals at international level, and in national development strategies at national level;
  • Developing equity-focused and gender-responsive National Evaluation policies.

This special event has been organised in lieu of the February seminar normally held by the AES Vic Committee at Vic Health. Please note the change of time, date and venue.

We look forward to your participation.

Special general meeting documents:
Notice of Special General Meeting (with Proxy form)
Approval draft of Constitution
Current constitution

 

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