Member login
 
   
Forgot Login?   Sign up  

ImprovingEvaluation

QLD

qlddddd 600

Date and Time: Wednesday 27th November 2019, 12:30 pm to 6:00 pm (registration from 12pm), followed by networking drinks
Theme: From the inside out – challenging social isolation and the repurposing of profit for social good
Venue: Griffith University - South Bank campus, Cnr Stanley & Sidon Streets Southbank Parklands, Brisbane 4000
Registrations close: Wednesday 20th November 2019
Fees (GST inclusive): AES and AMSRS members $150, Non-Members $240, Full-time Students $150 (please send copy of student ID card to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Date and time: Tuesday 29th October 2019, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am) - Please note that this workshop will also be run in Melbourne on Thursday 21st November. Click here for details.
Topic: Providing Evidence to Improve Organisational Performance: Uses of Evaluative Thinking
Location: Brisbane CBD QLD
Facilitators: Dr John Owen & Dr Rick Cummings
Register online by: 22 October 2019
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $484, Non-members $665, Student member $260, Student non-member $350

Workshop Overview

Evaluation can be seen as a main contributor to evidence based practice.   Evaluative thinking (ET) is a mechanism by which this takes place within an organisation.  This workshop suggests strategies for embedding ET into the working knowledge and decision-making of government and non-government agencies. 

This workshop will be provided by two of Australia’s most experienced evaluators of public programs, Dr John Owen, Principal Fellow at The University of Melbourne and Dr Rick Cummings, Emeritus Professor, Murdoch University. 

Date and time: Wednesday 6th November 2019 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Reflective Recidivism Reduction - The Sittella Street Project story
Presenter: Luke Thompson, Department of Youth Justice
Venue: Community room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane (Ground floor)
Register online by: noon on 4 November 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 2nd October 2019 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Mentoring and Coaching for Evaluator Capability Development
Presenter: Dr Lesley Petersen, Petersen Consulting
Venue: Community room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane (Ground floor)
Register online by: Monday 30th September 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 4th September 2019 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: How has the value-add of evaluation in public policy changed?
Presenter: Aaron Maher, Brianna Page, Nous Group
Venue: Community room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane (Ground floor)
Register online by: Friday 30th August 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 7th August 2019 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Strategic, tactical and operational: Extending the evaluators’ toolkit
Presenter: Dr Lyn Alderman, The Evaluators’ Collective
Venue: Community room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane (Ground floor)
Register online by: 5th August 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 3rd July 2019 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Addressing cultural and linguistic challenges in the evaluation process through community-engaged research
Presenter: Kate Murray, Queensland University of Technology
Venue: Community room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane (Ground floor)
Register online by: 1 July 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 5th June 2019 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Evaluation of Transition to Success
Presenter: Natasha Doherty & Nick Dwyer, Deloitte Access Economics
Venue: Community room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane (Ground floor)
Register online by: 3 June 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 3rd April 2019 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Using digital storytelling to evaluate youth-led tactical urbanism: An experiment
Presenter: Dr Rebecca Duell, Impact and Innovation Coordinator, YMCA of Brisbane Social Impact
Venue: Community room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: 1 April 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 1st May 2019 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Reflections on system-level evaluation
Presenter: Sarah Stamp, Principal Advisor QLD Family and Child Commission (QFCC)
Venue: Community room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: 26 April 2019

Date and time: Wednesday 6th March 2019 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: How to design, implement and evaluate strategic outcomes-based policy
Presenter: Dr Lyn Alderman, The Evaluators’ Collective
Venue: Community room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: 5 March 2019

Date and time: Monday 18th March 2019, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Topic: Practical Evaluation Capacity Building: Whose capacity to do what, why and how?
Location: Quay 4 room at Park Regis North Quay, 293 North Quay Brisbane QLD 4000
Facilitators: Vanessa Hood and Duncan Rintoul, Rooftop Social
Register online by: 12 March 2019
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Workshop Overview

This one-day course is for anyone who has a role (or would like to develop a role) in evaluation capacity building, in government, the community sector or business. It is suitable for people who are just starting to design an evaluation capacity building approach, through to those who have a few years’ experience under their belt.

Workshop title: Designing and Implementing a Monitoring and Evaluation System
Dates and time: 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th May 2019 (4 days) 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am) each day

  • Monday 13th May: Introduction to Designing and Implementing a Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation System; 
  • Tuesday 14th May: Planning for Monitoring and Evaluation functions; 
  • Wednesday 15th May: Developing System Capabilities for Data Collection and Analysis; 
  • Thursday 16th May: Developing System Capabilities for Reflection and Reporting for Learning and Program Improvement

People can choose to participate in the full program or part of the program dependent upon their experience and needs

Location: Simpson room at Novotel Brisbane, 200 Creek Street, Brisbane 4000
Facilitators: Anne Markiewicz and Ian Patrick
Registrations close:  Tuesday 7th May 2019
Fees (GST inclusive): For all 4 workshops: Members $1,650, Non-members $2,270. For day workshops: Members $440, Non-members $605 (per day)

Date and time: Wednesday 6th February 2019 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Is this strategy working? The systems thinking approach to investing for impact
Presenter: Dr Lewis Atkinson, Haines Centre for Strategic Management LLC
Venue: Community room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: 1 February 2019

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please forward onto your networks.

Date and time: Monday 25th February 2019, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: The Studio Room at Ibis Hotel, 27-35 Turbot Street, Brisbane QLD 4000
Facilitator: Dr Lewis Atkinson
Register online by: 19 February 2019
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Purpose of Workshop

"Well, that was a royal waste of time!" How many times have you left a meeting and either thought this yourself or heard another say it aloud? Evaluation meetings ARE a waste of time . . . IF they are not effectively guided through a series of important processes that ensure group input is focused and balanced on achieving the desired outcomes.

Unfortunately, facilitation skills are seldom taught intentionally, seldom studied and implemented with finesse, and usually ignored as a field of study for evaluation and transformational change. Yet, it is one of the most important and powerful tools leaders can use to lead and manage evaluation and strategy in a disruptive world.

How can an evaluator guide this critical work with a team if (a) when you are “speaking to power” (b) empowering the powerless (c) a single voice dominates the conversation, (d) hostility overtakes content, (e) the focus becomes blurred, or (f) there no is cohesive structure and process to ensure success?

This workshop will demonstrate how to apply the systems thinking approach to design and confidently facilitate group sessions within the context of evaluation practice within your workplace &/or on behalf of your clients.

QLD 18 edited 24444


JOINT AES & AMSRS QLD SYMPOSIUM: ENGAGE, EMPATHISE AND EMPOWER!

Using Behavioural Insights to understand the decision maker.

Date and Time: Thursday 8th November 2018, 12:30 pm to 5:30 pm (registration from 12pm), followed by networking drinks
Venue: Griffith University - South Bank campus & The Ship Inn, Cnr Stanley & Sidon Streets Southbank Parklands, Brisbane 4000
Register online by noon Monday 5th November 2018
Fees (GST inclusive): AES and AMSRS members $150, Non-Members $240, Full-time Students $150 (please send copy of student ID card to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Date and time: Monday 8th October 2018 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: The evaluation and monitoring of the Legacy program, GC 2018 Commonwealth Games – an update
Presenter: Robert Grimshaw, Department of Innovation, Tourism Industry Development and the Commonwealth Games
Venue: Central meeting room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Thursday 4th October 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please forward onto your networks.

Date and time: Monday 3rd September 2018 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Omani Cultural Values and Their Impact on Evaluation
Presenter: Buthaina Haroon Al Kindi (PhD Candidate), School of Psychology & Counselling, Faculty of Health Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety (CRRS Q) Queensland University of Technology
Venue: Central meeting room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Thursday 30th August 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please forward onto your networks.

Date and time: Monday 6th August 2018 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Maximising Utility of Evaluation Findings: Using a Realist Evaluation Model in a Government and University Partnership to Generate Usable Outcomes in a Community Service Context
Presenter: Kate E Williams, Donna Berthelsen, Queensland University of Technology
Venue: Community Room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Thursday 2nd August 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please forward onto your networks.

Date and time: Thursday 30th August 2018, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: SAS Boardroom at Ibis Styles Brisbane, Elizabeth Street, Brisbane QLD 4000
Facilitator: Carol Vale
Register online by: extended to noon on Monday 27th August 2018
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Date and time: Monday 2nd July 2018 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Indigenous lives matter and so should your evaluation
Presenter: Carol Vale, Managing Director, Murawin
Venue: Tiered Theatrette at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Thursday 28th June 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please forward onto your networks.

Date and time: Monday 4th June 2018 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Program evaluation in practice – how we approached it & lessons learnt for the Healthy Workers Initiative
Presenter: Roslyn Miller, A/Principal Advisor, Healthy Workers Initiative
Venue: Central meeting room at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Wednesday 30th May 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please forward onto your networks.

Date and time: Tuesday 22nd May 2018, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Workshop title: Mentoring for evaluator capability development: Enhancing evaluator knowledge and skills through mentoring
Location:  L5-Jen 1 Room at Hotel Jen Brisbane, 159 Roma Street, Brisbane 4000 QLD
Facilitator: Lesley Petersen
Register online by: extended to Wednesday 16 May 2018
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Workshop Overview

Mentoring provides a long-term, sustainable approach to embedding effective evaluation practices and continually growing evaluation capability and capacity across the organisation, through supporting emerging and experienced evaluators. The purpose of this workshop is to provide participants with an opportunity to explore and apply a range of processes, benefits and effective practices of mentoring, for people in both mentor and mentee roles. A focus of the discussion will be on how mentoring can support the professional development of the mentee and what professional development supports the mentor’s practice.

Date and time: Monday 9th April 2018 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Emerging issues for conducting evaluation in complex adaptive systems
Presenter: Dr Kevin Burgess, Cranfield University, UK
Venue: Tiered Theatrette at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Wednesday 4th April 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please forward onto your networks.

Date and time: Monday 14th May 2018 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Building evaluation capital by transforming capability and mindsets: A Queensland departmental approach
Presenter: Sarah Goswami, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, QLD
Venue: Tiered Theatrette at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Wednesday 9th May 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please forward onto your networks.

Date and time: Monday 5th March 2018 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: The science that underpins evaluative practice. What it is and why it matters
Presenter: Dr Jennifer Moffatt, Jennifer Moffatt Consulting
Venue: Tiered Theatrette at the Brisbane Square Library, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Wednesday 28th February 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES.

Seminar overview

The purpose of this presentation is to provide a broad, generic overview of the social science that underpins some everyday evaluation activities. For this reason, it may be of most interest to those who conduct evaluations. The goal is to build on existing knowledge through providing a deeper understanding, and showing how scientific rigour can be increased.

The seemingly eclectic list of topics was chosen based on the presenter’s experience of where challenges lay for the unsuspecting evaluator/researcher.

The five topics to be covered are: the evaluation question; paradigms; triangulation/mixed methods; sampling (non-probability); and judging quality (trustworthiness). For each concept, the science is described, then why knowing the science matters. Examples, tips and interactive exercises are used to facilitate understanding.

The goal is not to provide a comprehensive account of each topic, but to focus on understanding the science dimension, or one aspect of it, and to provide ideas for strengthening the science. By the completion of the presentation participants could reasonably expect to have new knowledge which they could apply immediately, and some basic principles that could guide practice.

Presenter background

Most of Jennifer’s research career has been in competitively funded university research centres at the University of Queensland or the University of Melbourne. She has also spent time in the State government in research/evaluation administration and evaluator roles. Jennifer’s formal research training is a Master of Social Science (Applied in Anthropology and Sociology) and a PhD in social science. For further information see: www.jennifermoffattconsulting.com.au


 

Date and time: Wednesday 7th February 2018 12:30 - 1.30pm
Topic: Visualising data for more effective communication in evaluation
Presenter: Ellen Vasiliauskas. d-sipher
Venue: Brisbane Square Library, Community Meeting Room, Ground Level, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Friday 2nd February 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES.

Seminar overview

Data visualisation is a significant and hot topic of discussion overseas. According to Friedman (2008) the "main goal of data visualisation is to communicate information clearly and effectively through graphical means”.

Evaluation reports and presentations are often lagging in the presentation of data and information. Presentations and reports suffer from being text based, dense and laden with content that fails to engage and hold the attention of the reader. PowerPoint presentations still contain too many bullet points. Yet we know that people more readily absorb information through visual means and that our evaluation audiences and decision makers want to be able to quickly grasp key facts and findings.

In the past five to ten years there have been significant advances in data visualisation in regards to knowledge in this area and the available software to assist us. It is a field that is growing quickly.

Data visualisation is an under-used and often a little understood resource, yet it offers significant opportunities for evaluators to better communicate findings, to gain bigger and new perspectives on data, to prompt thinking, and to allow readers to quickly eyeball large amounts of information and to easily digest and recall key facts and findings. This seminar will provide a short introduction to data visualisation and a taste of what will be covered in next month’s Data Visualisation Workshop being conducted by Ellen Vasiliauskas for the AES in Brisbane.

Presenter background

Ellen Vasiliauskas is the Director of d-sipher, an award-winning Queensland-based consultancy specialising in evaluation to inform improvements to programs, service delivery and organisational development. d-sipher has recently been conducting work in the education, communications, local government, not for profit, energy, arts, and health sectors locally and interstate.

Ellen’s special interest is in data visualisation and the communication of insights in complex projects to assist decision-makers in applying evaluation outcomes. Ellen holds a Master in Neuro Linguistic Programming and is a Business and Personal Coach.

Ellen served as a judge on the AES Awards for Excellence in Evaluation Committee for eight years and has won several awards, including the AES 2005 Evaluation Policies, Systems, Frameworks or Methodologies Award and the AES 1998 Best Public Sector Evaluation Award for her work for the Australian Defence Force.


 

Date and time: Monday 6 November 2017. 12:30 - 1:30pm
Topic: Facilitating participation in early childhood education and care for families from refugee backgrounds
Presenter: Cherie Lamb, University of New England
Venue: Brisbane Square Library, Community Meeting Room, Ground Level, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Wednesday 1st November 2017

Date and time: Monday 11th - Tuesday 12th December 2017, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Mitchell room at Mercure Brisbane, 85 - 87 North Quay, Brisbane QLD 4000
Presenter: Anne Markiewicz, Anne Markiewicz and Associates
Register online by: Monday 4th December 2017
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

Date and time: Monday 9 October 2017. 12:30 - 1:30pm
Topic: Building evaluation capacity in a government cross disciplinary agency
Presenter: Brent Turner, Office of industrial Relations (Qld.)
Venue: Brisbane Square Library, Community Meeting Room, Ground Level, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Wednesday 4th October 2017

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD branch of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES.

Date and time: Thursday 12th October 2017, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Mitchell room at Mercure Brisbane, 85 - 87 North Quay, Brisbane QLD 4000
Presenters: Dr Jeff Coutts, Coutts J&R
Register online by: 9:00am, Tuesday 10th October 2017
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Workshop Overview

The purpose of this workshop is to better plan, design and analyse a survey for impact assessment of a project or program. It considers the aims of the survey and available sampling frame and those questions that are needed to fulfil these aims and which are relevant to the sampled group.

The outcomes / objectives of the workshop are:

  • Increased understanding and confidence in the planning and design of impact surveys
  • Increased confidence in understanding/explaining the results of impact surveys
  • Increased networking with others engaged in survey design and application

The workshop will be interactive and participants will be asked to apply the approach to their own project/ need/ context to better ground the learning in practice during the course of workshop.

Date and time: Tuesday 20th March 2018, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Simpson room at Novotel Brisbane, 200 Creek Street, Brisbane QLD 4000
Facilitator: Ellen Vasiliauskas
Register online by: 12 March 2018
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Workshop Overview

Presenting and reporting results so that stakeholders easily understand them is a critical aspect of successful evaluations. This workshop will develop your skills to grab the attention of your stakeholders and communicate evaluation findings effectively through the visualisation and communication of data.
The workshop will guide you through the good and bad of data visualisation and the top tips for applying visualisation and communication concepts to reporting and presenting quantitative and qualitative results. The benefits of these techniques are many: results are more accessible, the meaning of complex information is clearer, and decision-makers can grasp and retain key points more easily.

Date and time: Monday 4 September 2017. 12:30 - 1:30pm
Topic: Realist theory meets systems thinking meets complexity theory
Presenter: Kylie Brosnan, IPSOS
Venue: Brisbane Square Library, Community Meeting Room, Ground Level, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Wednesday 30th August 2017

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD branch of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES.

Date and time: Monday 21st and Tuesday 22nd of August 2017, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Mackellar Room at Novotel Brisbane, 200 Creek Street, Brisbane QLD 4000
Presenters: Dr Samantha Abbato with Wendy Muller and Damian Caniglia
Register online by: Wednesday 16th August
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

Date and time: Monday 7 August 2017. 12:30 - 1:30pm
Topic: Collective Impact: the challenges of measuring and evaluating collaborative action
Presenter: Jerry Marston, The Incus Group
Venue: Brisbane Square Library, Community Meeting Room, Ground Level, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Wednesday 2nd August 2017

This is a free seminar organised by the QLD branch of the AES. Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in Queensland and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES.

Date and time: Monday 3rd July 2017. 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Topic: Developing the evaluation and monitoring framework for the Legacy Program, Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games
Presenter: Robert Grimshaw, Office of the Commonwealth Games, Department of Tourism, Major Events, Small Business and the Commonwealth Games
Venue: Brisbane Square Library, Community Meeting Room, Ground level, 266 George St, Brisbane
Register online by: Thursday 29th June 2017

Date and Time: Monday 5 June 2017 12:30 - 1.30pm
Venue: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Presenter: Dr Samantha Abbato, Visual Insights
Registrations close: Wednesday 31st May 2017

Our free monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with other AES members in Queensland, to share and learn from the experiences of other evaluators.

The power of evaluation is its ability to provide meaningful information for use in decisions about programs, organisations and policies. This power is diminished by both the lack of use and misuse of evaluation that in large part can be attributed to ineffective communication. Successfully communicating evaluation findings to stakeholders can result in evaluation findings being a catalyst for positive policy, practice and organisational change. For stakeholders who want to apply evaluation recommendations to policy and practice with confidence, effective communication also includes being armed with a framework to assess the credibility of evaluation findings.

Through case studies of evaluation reporting for a number of different clients in health and communities sectors over thirteen years of independent consultancy practice, the pros and cons of different practical approaches that improve communication and use of evaluation are covered. Strategies for assessing credibility and avoiding the pitfalls of misuse of evaluation findings and recommendations are discussed. In addition, I touch on the use design principles, pictures, stories and innovative approaches to evaluation reporting for engaging, motivating and catering to varying communication styles.

Samantha Abbato is an evaluation consultant and Director of Visual Insights, a pictures and stories approach to evaluation. Sam has completed more than 100 evaluation and research reports and papers for a range of government, non-government organisations and community stakeholders. She has numerous published book chapters and peer-reviewed journal articles and worked as a freelance journalist for several years. Sam was the recipient of the 2015 AES Evaluation Publication Award (Caulley Tulloch Award). Sam’s academic qualifications include: a PhD (Epidemiology) and MPH (Epidemiology/Biostatistics), UC Berkeley (1997). She is a specialist in health and community sector evaluation with extensive experience in utilisation-focussed and participatory evaluation approaches.

Date and time: Thursday 4th and Friday 5th of May 2017, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Moreton & Bribie Rooms, Hotel Jen, 159 Roma Street Brisbane 4000
Presenter: Ian Patrick
Register online by: Monday 1st May, 2017 - limited spaces available
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

About the workshop
Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Frameworks are becoming increasingly important for developing an agreed approach to the assessment of results achieved and to aid organisational learning. The M&E Framework identifies expected results, key evaluation questions and the means to answer these questions through routine monitoring and periodic evaluation. It also provides a guide to the implementation of M&E processes over the life of a program or other initiative. Monitoring and evaluation functions are essential to the effective operation of programs and will contribute to the overall value derived from them. M&E Frameworks should support decision-making, allocation of resources and program refinement based on lessons learned.

This workshop follows the structure of the text book ‘Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks’ authored by Dr Ian Patrick and Anne Markiewicz. It will present a clear and staged conceptual model for the systematic development of an M&E Framework. It will examine a range of steps and techniques involved in the design and implementation of the framework; explore potential design issues and implementation barriers; cover the development of a Program Logic; the identification of key evaluation questions; the development of performance indicators; and identification of processes for data collection, on-going analysis and reflection based on data generated.

The facilitator will encourage interactive peer to peer dialogue to share experiences and learning, and also draw on case studies to encourage application of knowledge and skills to evaluation contexts.

Content

  • The importance and function of monitoring and evaluation processes
  • 'Table of Contents' for the development of an M&E Framework – what to do and in what order
  • Design of a viable M&E framework
  • Application of M&E frameworks to programs
  • Key challenges and barriers, and how to address them

Outcomes and Benefits

ipatrick 250

Who should attend?
This workshop offers professionals from across government, universities and not for profit and consulting organisations foundation skills in planning for monitoring and evaluation of a program. You would benefit most from the workshop if you have some prior knowledge of evaluation, particularly program theory and program logic and some practical experience with evaluation activities.

About the facilitator: Ian Patrick
Dr. Ian Patrick is an independent consultant and Director of Ian Patrick and Associates. His career as an evaluator extends over around 20 years and includes a focus on both Australia and the Asia Pacific region. He has broad experience across different social sectors such as health, education, law and justice, community development, and human rights and Indigenous issues. Ian has worked with a range of organisations and programs in developing monitoring and evaluation systems, and conducted evaluation-related training programs including on Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks. Ian is an Honorary Senior Fellow, Development Studies Program at the University of Melbourne and was previously the leader of the evaluation practice area at the International NGO Training and Research Centre, UK.

Date and time: Monday 8 May 2017 12:30 - 1:30
Topic: The role of evaluative thinking in impact investing
Presenter: Natasha Doherty, Deloitte Access Economics
Venue: Community Meeting Room, BRISBANE SQUARE LIBRARY, Brisbane Square Library, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Register online by: 04/05/17

In a changing political, economic and organisational landscape there are resultant changes in the funding of social programs and this has implications for evaluators and evaluation. It is important evaluators understand what the impact of impact investing will have on their role, methods and practice now and into the future as governments roll out trials. As such, the presentation seeks to a) examine the role of evaluation practice and the evaluator in impact investing b) discuss innovative methods that can be used in field for the purpose of evaluating impact investing initiatives. In doing so, it seeks to advance the audience’s understanding of impact investing and how this influences their practice.

Natasha Doherty is a Partner within the Health Economics and Social Policy team in Deloitte Access Economics. She has over 12 years experience in Government policy evaluation including health, and the social policy sector. Natasha has worked on a variety of evaluations such as review of commonwealth and state based reform, evaluation of innovation and redesign programs, and funding model assessments. She was the lead author for the impact investing Australia report “A practical guide to understanding social cost”

Our monthly seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with other AES members in Queensland, to share and learn from the experiences of other evaluators.

Date and time: 3rd April 2017, from 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Topic: Impact assessment versus ROI in Learning and Development - organisational culture versus individual skills
Presenter: Diana Seekers, Manager, Organisational Development, Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services
Venue: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Register online by: 30 March 2017

Those of us in the learning and capability building space are all about facilitating change – changes in behaviour, in knowledge, in systems or processes, in people’s attitudes and views. But people are funny creatures – they don’t do what they are told, nor what they learn, nor what they say they’ll do. And people aren’t the organisation – or perhaps they are...?!!!! We expend time, energy, intellectual effort and resources to facilitate behaviour change for a variety of reasons – but how do we know our efforts result in change? And whether this change is beneficial? And was it the change we were aiming for?

Great questions in any work, and ones that have plagued the Learning and Development [L&D] community for years. In fact for the last 50 years or so, the main model of ‘evaluation’ in L&D has been Kirkpatrick’s Model which looks at the four levels of reaction, learning, behaviour and results. More recently a fifth layer has been added to examine Return on Investment [ROI].

This lunchtime session will examine why many of us have found the first levels of this model are of little real interest, and the fourth and fifth levels are not easily measured and often do not have organisational support. We will also discuss the experience of good practitioners who can intuitively identify good or great programs, but struggle to identify what makes them ‘good’. The connections between these conversations and considerations distinguishing between efficiency and outputs versus effectiveness and outcomes; and how does complexity theory come into the mix? Why through the magic of Cynefin, of course!

This session is for anyone engaged in projects or initiatives which seek to improve or change the current reality to something else...

Diana Seekers has worked as an independent or internal consultant for over 30 years, with expertise in organisational development, learning and capability development, and strategic leadership. She has worked across all three tiers of government, the not-for-profit sector in four states across Children’s, Disability and Aged Services, as well as manufacturing in both food and metal industries. A past Director of a Registered Training Organisation specialising in Change Management and NGO Skill Development, she is experienced in utilising capability development as a leveraging tool for development of both Service Quality and Market or Sector responsiveness. Diana has worked as the Manager of Organisational

Development within the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services for the last 9 years, with a particular interest over the last 3 years in Staff Support and the workplace impacts of Domestic and Family Violence.For years she has encountered questions such as ‘how do we know if we’ve got it right?’ ‘how do we know that our people have learned what is needed?’ ‘what has been the impact of what we’ve done, and was it what we intended?’ and collaborated with clients to attempt to answer these same questions over and over with less than satisfactory responses.

These conundrums have lead Diana to investigate Human Systems, and to study with Meg Wheatley and Dave Snowden, as well as to apply the Kirkpatrick Evaluation Model to training. This eclectic mix has led to some interesting revelations which we will share in this session.

Date and time: Monday 6 March 2017, from 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Presenter: Dr Bryn Hughes, Institute for Social Science Research
Venue: Community Meeting Room, BRISBANE SQUARE LIBRARY, Brisbane Square Library, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Register online by: 1 March 2017
This is a free evaluation seminar presented by the Queensland regional branch of the Australasian Evaluation Society

Experience tells us that our working environments are made up of constantly changing circumstances set against a backdrop of diverse – and often contrasting – stakeholder opinions and goals. This perennial reality is challenging enough without being handed down evaluation and management tools that are ill-equipped to deal with dynamic and contested worlds. The purpose of this highly interactive discussion is to first shine the light on how ill-equipped mainstream evaluation tools and techniques are, and second to explore ways to adapt the tools and techniques each of us already uses today. The main aim of the seminar is that each attendee leave with at least one concrete means of making their future evaluations more compatible with the dynamism and contestation that characterises our complex world.

Dr Bryn Hughes (Australia, USA) specialises in applying Complexity Thinking to organisational performance, learning, and evaluation. With a PhD from the University of Queensland and an MBA from Queensland University of Technology, he currently leads a research project which explores the experiences of Australian women deployed in peace and security operations around the globe. He has also managed a four-year postdoctoral fellowship project which placed Complexity Thinking at the core of how to monitor and evaluate peace operations’ effectiveness. This work included dialogue with the United Nations, European Union and the OECD. Bryn has published over a dozen peer-reviewed journal articles and three books on topics related to evaluation and Complexity.

Date and time: Thursday 30th and Friday 31st of March 2017, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Oxley Room, Mercure Brisbane, 85-87 North Quay, Brisbane QLD 4000
Presenter: Ian Patrick
Register online by: Thursday 23rd of March 2017
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

About the workshop
Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Frameworks are becoming increasingly important for developing an agreed approach to the assessment of results achieved and to aid organisational learning. The M&E Framework identifies expected results, key evaluation questions and the means to answer these questions through routine monitoring and periodic evaluation. It also provides a guide to the implementation of M&E processes over the life of a program or other initiative. Monitoring and evaluation functions are essential to the effective operation of programs and will contribute to the overall value derived from them. M&E Frameworks should support decision-making, allocation of resources and program refinement based on lessons learned.

This workshop follows the structure of the text book ‘Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks’ authored by Dr Ian Patrick and Anne Markiewicz. It will present a clear and staged conceptual model for the systematic development of an M&E Framework. It will examine a range of steps and techniques involved in the design and implementation of the framework; explore potential design issues and implementation barriers; cover the development of a Program Logic; the identification of key evaluation questions; the development of performance indicators; and identification of processes for data collection, on-going analysis and reflection based on data generated.

The facilitator will encourage interactive peer to peer dialogue to share experiences and learning, and also draw on case studies to encourage application of knowledge and skills to evaluation contexts.

Content

  • The importance and function of monitoring and evaluation processes
  • 'Table of Contents' for the development of an M&E Framework – what to do and in what order
  • Design of a viable M&E framework
  • Application of M&E frameworks to programs
  • Key challenges and barriers, and how to address them

Outcomes and Benefits

ipatrick 250

Who should attend?
This workshop offers professionals from across government, universities and not for profit and consulting organisations foundation skills in planning for monitoring and evaluation of a program. You would benefit most from the workshop if you have some prior knowledge of evaluation, particularly program theory and program logic and some practical experience with evaluation activities.

About the facilitator: Ian Patrick
Dr. Ian Patrick is an independent consultant and Director of Ian Patrick and Associates. His career as an evaluator extends over around 20 years and includes a focus on both Australia and the Asia Pacific region. He has broad experience across different social sectors such as health, education, law and justice, community development, and human rights and Indigenous issues. Ian has worked with a range of organisations and programs in developing monitoring and evaluation systems, and conducted evaluation-related training programs including on Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks. Ian is an Honorary Senior Fellow, Development Studies Program at the University of Melbourne and was previously the leader of the evaluation practice area at the International NGO Training and Research Centre, UK.

Date and Time: 6th of February 2017, from 12.30pm til 1.30pm
Topic: Pathways to Professionalization
Presenter: Dr Lyn Alderman, Australasian Evaluation Society
Venue: Community Meeting Room, BRISBANE SQUARE LIBRARY, Brisbane Square Library, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Register by Date: 01/02/17
The Learning and Professional Practice Committee are focused on identifying advantages and disadvantages in Australasian contexts of potential paths to professionalisation; value of professionalisation for Australasian evaluators needs to be identified and/or demonstrated rather than assumed, and any path forward must be developed to suit Australasian context. Consideration of the Australasian context needs to clearly differentiate the status in each of the national jurisdictions – Australia, New Zealand, Pacific nations – to ensure that a pathway to professionalisation is developed that suits the evaluation context of each country, rather than focus on one-size-fits-all guidelines across Australasia.

There are clear differences in approach, standing and opportunities for skill development and professional development that need to be recognised. Differences in the markets for evaluation, and the lack of barriers to entry from associated areas of management consulting and market and social research, creates pressure points for Australian evaluators that may not exist in other jurisdictions. The role of Indigenous/Indigenous evaluators and their paths to professionalisation also needs respectful attention in each jurisdiction.

Strategic outcomes for the Learning and Professional Practice Committee: The evaluation sector is highly capable and Professional:

  • Professionalisation mechanism established
  • Evaluation standards are inclusive and clearly articulated
  • Professional learning pathways and options for emerging, advanced and returning evaluators
  • Professional competencies are supported and applied.

This presentation offers an opportunity to emerging, experienced and returning evaluators and commissioners to consider how ‘Pathways to Professionalisation’ may help them in their evaluative thinking and practice.

About: Dr Lyn Alderman, President, Australasian Evaluation Society and Associate Director Academic Quality and Standards, Chancellery, QUT. I have lead two policy portfolios over the last ten years at QUT. The first one is Course Quality Assurance (monitoring in evaluation terms) and the second is Evaluation of courses, units, teaching and student experience. These portfolios have provided exceptional opportunities to build my profile as the lead internal evaluator of a large institution (50K students and 10K staff).

Date and Time: Monday 28 November 2016, 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Presenter: Dr Jeff Coutts, Coutts J&R
Register by: Thursday 24 November 2016

This is a free event.

About the seminar

One of the big limitations of evaluation is tracking ‘what comes after’ an intervention: What did people do with the learning, information, new skills, resources or tools? Too often evaluations have been based on “bums on seats” – sometimes with the added bonus of participant feedback sheets – but not enough with meaningful follow-up impact information. Post-intervention surveys are one way to capture this. But how do we best design and undertake these? How do we sort out attribution and real benefits from an intervention? This presentation draws on examples of post-intervention surveys and shows the steps involved to effectively design and undertake them.

About the presenter

Dr Jeff Coutts is a Director of Coutts J&R and QualDATA – two companies working in the area of capacity building, communication and evaluation predominately in the rural and agricultural sectors. He is also an Adjunct Professor with the Centre for Applied Climate Science at USQ, on the editorial committee of the Journal of Agricultural Education & Extension and a member of the Australasian Pacific network (APEN). His passion has been in the design of effective evaluation processes to demonstrate impact – to effectively “tell the story” of a project or program - including more effective approaches in the use of follow-up surveys.


Date and Time: Wednesday 26 October 2016, 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Presenter: Leigh Clement, Sugar Research Australia Ltd
Register by: Monday 24 October 2016

This is a free event.

About the seminar
Since its inception three years ago, Sugar Research Australia Limited (SRA) has had to navigate and conquer its way through the complexities of establishing appropriate governance frameworks that both support its research activities and give surety to its investors. One of the greatest challenges facing SRA to-date has been the establishment of a robust monitoring and evaluation framework that provides both strategic and operational oversight and demonstrates research impact and return on investment. This AES lunchtime seminar will highlight: SRA’s monitoring and evaluation development process; the challenges faced by SRA along the way; the steps taken (and, in some cases, still being undertaken) to overcome these challenges and turn them into opportunities; and the resulting working framework.

About the presenter
Leigh Clement is SRA’s Executive Manager Investor Relations and is responsible for strengthening relationships with SRA’s government and industry investors and ensuring SRA’s research portfolio meets their needs and expectations. Leigh is also responsible for the development, management and oversight of SRA’s strategic planning and reporting frameworks, including monitoring and evaluation. Prior to joining SRA, Leigh worked within the strategic management and corporate governance areas of a number of large multi-faceted government and commercial organisations across a range of sectors.

Date and Time: Monday 26 September 2016, 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Presenter: Dr Jonathan Rhodes, The University of Queensland
Register by: Thursday 22 September 2016

This is a free event.

About the seminar
The world’s biodiversity and natural environments are critical for the maintenance of a wide range of environmental processes that we all depend on. However, much of this biodiversity is in decline due to threats such as habitat loss, agricultural and urban expansion, hunting, and climate change. As such, one of the most pressing problems for conservation is achieving the reversal of these declines. Identifying the appropriate decisions to achieve this requires an evaluation of the impact of different threats and the effectiveness of measures to mitigate those threats. In this seminar I will illustrate some of the evaluation techniques we use in the field of biodiversity conservation to inform decision-making using examples from koala conservation, coastal environmental management, and linear infrastructure planning.

About the presenter
Associate Professor Jonathan Rhodes is based in the School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management and the Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science at The University of Queensland (UQ). He received his PhD in Ecology in 2005 and has been at UQ since 2007, after two years at CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Hobart. His primary research interests lie in understanding the spatial processes that drive biodiversity and ecosystem services, and in developing fundamental principles for decision-making in conservation.

Date and Time: Monday 22 August 2016, 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Presenter: Bec Crompton, Onward to Outcomes
Register by: Thursday 18 August 2016

This is a free event.

About the seminar
Whether you’re managing service delivery yourself, or outsourcing others to do it, you can’t bury your head in the sand any longer. Outcomes measurement is here to stay. It’s time to move from your outputs-measuring comfort zone into the brave new world of asking service users what they want and need, and measuring your effectiveness in helping them achieving that. But how? What’s the first step to take? And the second? How can you inspire leadership and buy-in around the organisational change involved and ensure everyone understands their new outcomes measurement responsibilities? Becoming a client-centred, outcomes-based learning service that substantially and continually improves front-line delivery isn’t easy. But it can be made more simple if you have a road map. Come and get yours here.

About the presenter
Bec Crompton is the creator of Onward to Outcomes©, a program which supports funders and organisations to transition from output to outcomes measurement. Her passion for amplifying the voices of vulnerable communities in decision making has guided her 20-year not-for-profit service delivery and senior management career, and ensures a robust, client-centric approach. Originally from the UK, Bec has a Masters in International Development Management and has expertly woven her global experience of developing outcomes frameworks for the delivery and evaluation of complex social change projects with the current needs of the Australian not-for-profit sector. Onward to Outcomes© is a very timely, step-by-step process which allows organisations to embrace the new outcomes-based funding environment with confidence.

Date and time: Tuesday 30 August 2016, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Maida Lilley Centre, 1/5 Green Close, Fortitude Valley, 4006 (cnr Constance & Alfred Streets)
Presenter: Dr Carol Quadrelli, QUT
Register online by: Thursday 25 August 2016
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

About the workshop
This workshop is designed for professionals who want to increase the ethical integrity and rigour in their evaluations and research project frameworks. It is for professionals with a role in planning, commissioning and managing evaluations who want to gain knowledge, and consolidate their understanding of how ethics and governance impacts on practice and outcomes. The workshop will be interactive with the opportunity for you to work through practical examples and activities throughout to challenge your thinking and potential application for ethical frameworks. This workshop will incorporate the AES Code of Ethics – promoting ethical evaluation practice and AES Learning Competencies Framework.

Workshop content
Ethics and frameworks
• Contextualising ethics
• Organisational culture, ethical approaches and ethical self-awareness. Embedding ethical conduct in policy, strategy, evaluation projects and practice

Ethical considerations for professionals
• Embedding principles and steps in planning and implementing evaluation projects
• Ethics and a robust evaluation plan
• Techniques for developing and prioritising evaluation questions
• Consultation, stakeholder engagement and ethical governance in commissioning evaluations

Case studies/practical examples (experiences from the field: participants and presenter).
• Ethics and risk management (managing ethical conundrums)
• Optimising the impact and use of ethical frameworks in evaluation for project teams and other stakeholders.

Community of Practice
• Resources and support

Outcomes and Benefits include:
• Understanding of the AES Guidelines for the Ethical Conduct of Evaluations that underpin the Evaluators' Professional Learning Competency Framework and their potential to enhance rigour in evaluation design.
• An understanding of how ethics and governance inform research /evaluation frameworks, practice and outcomes.
• Strategies for negotiating ethical scenarios.

Who should attend?
Professionals from all sectors working in roles that relate to the planning, commissioning or managing of evaluations, project management and policy. No prior experience in evaluation is required.

Workshop facilitator
Dr Carol Quadrelli
Carol has over 25 years' experience in the higher education sector coupled with significant industry experience across state and local governments. This experience includes academic and professional roles across three Qld universities as well as project managing a diverse range of small scale and larger national projects (all qualitative and requiring rigorous ethical frameworks). Her qualifications include: Doctor of Philosophy (QUT), Graduate Diploma in Early Childhood Education (QUT) and a BA Humanities with Honours (GU). Carol is passionate about social justice, methodologies and the importance of embedding ethical codes/frameworks into practice. She has lectured in Social Ethics for Justice Processionals (School of Justice, QUT) and strong engagement with ethics' committees and guidelines. Her multidisciplinary background encompasses Education, Sociology and Criminology discipline areas. Research interests include qualitative research and feminist methodologies, ethics, evaluation, higher education, female offending, corrections, death investigation and the coronial system.

Topic: Engaging Youth Workers in Evaluative Practice
Date and Time: Monday 25 July 2016, 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Presenter: Rhianon Vichta, Brisbane Youth Service/ReWa Consulting
Register by: Thursday 21 July 2016

This is a free event.

About the seminar
Within the current community services environment, program outcomes evaluation is no longer an optional extra or a luxury only the well-funded can enjoy. This places Evaluation Capacity Building as a critical priority for service sustainability, in addition to its value in promoting program effectiveness. This presentation will explore key approaches, challenges and celebrations encountered in an ongoing journey of constructing internal evaluation systems and engaging youth workers in evaluative practice.

About the presenter
Rhianon Vichta became an evaluator after spending more than 20 years delivering, designing, managing and working to improve social programs both in Australia and overseas. Throughout her career journey from crisis counsellor to CEO, she continued to seek answers to the fundamental question “How do we know we are making a real difference?” Now she works within the community sector supporting organisations, programs and individuals to engage with their passion for reflective practice and to gather evidence that will help shape better services for people who are vulnerable and disadvantaged.

For a copy of the PowerPoint presentation click here

header24

A joint event conducted by the Australasian Evaluation Society, The Australian Market and Social Research Society and the Queensland University of Technology to grow the capacity of social research, market research and evaluation by collaborating across networks

Date: Wednesday 13th July 2016
Time: Registration from 12:30pm, ​Symposium from 1:00pm - 7:00pm followed by drinks and canapés
Venue: Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove Campus Victoria Park Rd, Kelvin Grove QLD
Costs (inc GST): AES and AMSRS members: $77.00, AES Student members: $50.00, Non-Members: $135.00, Student Non-Members: $80.00
Register before: Monday 11 July 2016

For a full program click here

About the Symposium

Governments and commercial organisations are overwhelmed by the sheer mass of data that may be analysed and underwhelmed with techniques available to analyse it.

  • Using big data for change, how can public and private data improve or transform policy, programs and customer experience?
  • How can big data innovate and improve evaluation and market research?

More and more researchers and evaluators are using both ambient and active data, in all forms and sizes, to draw insights for better decision-making. To fully realize and unlock the value in big data, they need to have the technological tools, theoretical frameworks, methodological and ethical principles in order to move from traditional methods to digital methods of research.

In this symposium, we will connect market and social researchers and evaluation professionals with data scientists, technologists and digital innovators to explore the opportunities and challenges in applying big data to market and social research and evaluation.

Keynote Speakers, Panelists and Workshop Presenters:

Who should attend?

  • Social marketers, social researchers, evaluators, statisticians and buyers of these services
  • Managers and practitioners in policy, program development, evaluation, review, research, business and market analysis, social planning and community engagement
  • Government, not-for-profit and private sectors
  • Academics and students from faculties dealing with social and economic change such as health, business, creative industries, biomedical, environmental, education, law, public administration, social sciences.

Topic: Challenges of evaluation within a complex setting and diverse populations A case study of the development of an evaluation framework for a statewide early childhood education health program.'
Date and Time: Monday 27 June 2016, 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Presenter: Phoebe Cleland, QUT - School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Register by: Thursday 23 June 2016

This is a free event.

About the seminar
Designing a responsive evaluation framework that listens to all voices in a diverse sector can be challenging, especially when it also needs to fit in with regulatory frameworks and meet the needs of the funder. Health promotion programs are often designed so that they are responsive to diversity but it is equally important that the evaluation of these programs is responsive as well. The early childhood education and care sector in Queensland is incredibly diverse not only in the types of services and their geography but also in their staff in terms of qualifications, job roles and cultural background. The LEAPS Project (Learning, Eating, Active Play, Sleep) provided professional development to early childhood educators across Queensland on healthy eating and physical activity for early childhood educators, funded by the Queensland Government.

This seminar will outline the processes that the LEAPS Project took to develop a responsive evaluation framework including:

  • Consultation processes used to develop the evaluation framework
  • Development of tools and evaluation processes that build capacity rather than burden
  • Aligning evaluation with sector regulatory frameworks
  • Use of reference groups to ensure cultural appropriateness

About the presenter
Phoebe Cleland is the Project Manager and lead evaluator of the LEAPS Project (Learning, Eating, Active Play, Sleep), which provides professional development on the nutrition and physical activity guidelines in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings. Phoebe graduated from the University of Otago with a BSc (Human Nutrition) and a Post-Graduate Diploma in Public Health. Phoebe has worked in a range of different areas including childhood sleep & obesity research, public health nutrition and physical activity, refugee nutrition and food security.

For a copy of the powerpoint presentation click here

Date and Time: Wednesday 15 June 2016, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Apunipima Cape York Health Council Board Room, 186 McCoombe Street, Bungalow, Cairns
Presenter: Robert Corrie, Side-by-Side Consulting
Register by: Thursday 9 June 2016
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

About the workshop
When Indigenous people enter and do business with the non-Indigenous world, they expect to adopt the language, dress and communication styles of those around them in order to be heard. But what happens when non-Indigenous government employees visit community? How do they engage with the community and step into their world? If not, will they know and interpret what they see and hear? How relevant is the agenda they take with them into this unknown context?

Evaluators have a responsibility to design evaluation processes in order to find out the effectiveness of programs and policies in the community. How well does the usual kit-bag of evaluation tools equip them?

In this workshop, Robert Corrie, an Indigenous evaluator of Side by Side Consulting, will mentor, guide and coach policy and program developers, evaluators and service providers to see below the surface, unpack their assumptions and devise sound cultural evaluation practices to work in Indigenous settings. The workshop will develop the skills of evaluators to grow the capacity of communities and their people to use their stories and voices as evidence to shape policies and programs to meet their needs.

The aim of the workshop is to equip participants with easy-to-use principles that enable them to align their organisational needs with the lived experience of Indigenous communities so that the evaluation holds meaning and guides decisions.

The workshop will draw from Robbie’s extensive experience in talking with communities across Cape York and Arnhem land and will develop participants’ critical eye for sound cultural evaluation practice.

The workshop will focus on three key areas:

  • understanding Indigenous community values, relationships and realities
  • gathering evidence that matters – an Indigenous perspective
  • developing evaluation capacity of communities and individuals.

Outcomes and Benefits
Participants will receive the following outcomes and benefits by attending this workshop:

  • Understanding rules of engagement to gain trust and reciprocation
  • Critical cultural reflection of evaluation practices: gathering evidence and reporting

About the PresenterRCorrie
Robert Corrie is a traditional owner from Cape York Peninsula. Robbie’s traditional ownerships include Wuthathi from the East Coast of Cape York Peninsula and Yupungathi from the West Coast of Cape York Peninsula. As founder and principal of Side by Side Consulting, an Indigenous owned and operated research company, Robbie has a wealth of experience in engaging with Indigenous communities and their people and in conducting research across Australia.

Robbie has a deep understanding of working with Indigenous and marginalised communities thereby ensuring ethically sound principles. He is well versed in mixed mode methodologies, qualitative and quantitative research and is experienced in qualitative research questions, qualitative score cards, participatory action research and other survey methods. Robbie won the Highly Commended Award category for Innovation in Methodology at the Research Industry Council of Australia’s Research Effectiveness Awards 2012 for his work with community members in Wadeye (NT) in relation to an Australian Football League program designed to keep young people out of trouble.

Date and Time: Monday 23 May 2016, 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Presenter: Dr Maria Raciti, University of Sunshine Coast
Register by: Thursday 19 May 2016

This is a free event.

About the seminar
Enhancing the quality of life of individuals, communities and societies as a whole is at the heart of the efforts of many non-profit organisations, governments and social marketers. Social marketing seeks to encourage people to voluntarily change their behaviours for their own good and for the collective good and has been used to successfully address issues such as healthy eating, organ donation, binge drinking and more recently, widening the participation of under-represented groups in higher education.

Often social marketing interventions and campaigns focus upon or include people from vulnerable groups, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples who comprise Indigenous Australia. In many instances, these groups will gain the most from interventions and campaigns however it is difficult to access and engage with these groups. The implications of which include restricted consultation, the potential development of strategies that do not have adequate provision for self-determination or that include some degree of ‘cultural blindness’. In turn, evaluating the intervention or campaign with hard-to-get groups is constrained, leaving some degree of uncertainty as to the effectiveness of efforts.

This seminar will feature the challenges faced and the lessons learned from a completed social marketing study aimed at enhancing the aspirations and awareness of pathways into higher education among Indigenous school students. Furthermore, how these lessons have informed other current social marketing projects that have a similar focus will be shared. There will be opportunities for open discussion in this seminar to encourage the sharing of experiences and lessons learned from participants who have engaged with other hard-to-get groups.

About the presenter
Dr Maria Raciti is an Associate Professor in Marketing in the School of Business at the University of the Sunshine Coast. Maria is Co-leader of USC Indigenous Studies Research theme and her research interests include services marketing, social marketing and higher education. She regularly publishes in quality refereed journals and has numerous refereed conference papers, five of which have received outstanding paper awards. Dr Raciti is an Aboriginal woman and was the first Indigenous PhD graduate from CQU, the inaugural USC OLT citation recipient and the inaugural Associate Dean (Learning and Teaching) in the USC Faculty of Arts and Business.

Date and Time: Thursday 5 and Friday 6 May 2016, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Maida Lilley Centre, Level 1, 5 Green Square Close, Fortitude Valley Qld 4006
Presenter: Gill Westhorp
Register by: Monday 2 May 2016
Fees: GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

About the workshop

Many policies and programs are implemented in large systems, or expect to make changes at multiple levels of a system. Many approaches to program theory either assume that the program itself is simple, or ignore the implications of context for whether and how programs work.

Day one of this program will introduce various approaches to ‘systems’, ‘complexity’ and ‘context’. Participants will explore the implications for program design and for commissioning and conducting evaluations, and in particular, the many uses of theory for dealing with complexity.

Day two will focus on skills and strategies for evaluators working with complex systems. It will present a particular approach for

  • ‘layering’ systems, program theories and formal theories from different disciplines; and
  • using formal theories for evaluation design and analysis of evaluation findings.
    Implications for tendering, managing evaluations, and reporting will also be discussed.

The workshop is designed for evaluators and researchers, policy makers, strategic policy analysts, program designers, performance and quality improvement staff and others interested in conceptualising 'what works in complex systems’?

Each day will involve presentations, practical examples, small group work and whole group discussion.

About the presenterGill Westhorp200

Dr Gill Westhorp is an internationally-recognised specialist in realist research and evaluation methodologies, with an interest in the relationship between realist and complexity theories. She is Director of a small research and evaluation consultancy company; a Professorial Fellow at Charles Darwin University; an Associate at RMIT University; a member of the core team for the RAMESES I and RAMESES II projects based in Oxford, UK; and a member of the Advisory Committee for the Centre for the Advancement of Realist Evaluation and Synthesis (CARES) at Liverpool University, UK.

Topic: Policy reform using the 'hungry caterpillar' model – How do we know if we are making difference?
Date and Time: Monday 22 February 2016, 12:30pm to 1:30pm.
Presenter: Commissioner Dr Lesley Van Schoubroeck, Queensland Mental Health Commission
Venue: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library. Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Register online by: Thursday 19 February 2016

This is a free event

The Queensland Mental Health Commission's (QMHC) role is to drive on-going reform towards a more integrated, evidence-based, recovery-oriented mental health and substance misuse system. It is a small independent statutory body. It is essentially a change agent and policy advice is the key lever for reform.

Measuring effectiveness of such entities has always been problematic and can be avoided when they are part of a larger department as has been the case over more than 2 decades with offices such as seniors, women's interest, youth and so on.

The presentation provides an overview of the framework (that pictorially suggests a very hungry caterpillar) that links performance at the macro level as agreed in a whole of government strategic plan to the measured contribution of the QMHC to that change. It builds on the work undertaken internationally to understand the roles and effectiveness of backbone organisations for collective impact.

About the presenter

Lesley van Schoubroeck is the inaugural Commissioner/Chief Executive with an extensive background in social policy and the performance of government in the Western Australian public sector where effectiveness measures of all public sector agencies have long been mandated. Her observations are included in a range of publications including The Lure of Politics: Geoff Gallop's Government 2001-2006 and the Report of the WA Government's 2010 Economic Audit Committee, Putting the Public First which notes that many of the KPIs for policy entities are 'demonstrably useless'.

She took up the role in July 2013 and commissioned the evaluation framework in the first year. You can find more information at www.qmhc.qld.gov.au or follow Lesley on twitter @LESLEY_QMHC 

Date and time: Tuesday, 16 February 2016, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Maida Lilley Centre, 1/5 Green Close, Fortitude Valley, 4006 (cnr Constance & Alfred Streets)
Presenter: Dr Jess Dart, Founder Director, Clear Horizon Consulting Pty Ltd
Register online by: Tuesday, 9 February 2016
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

The increasing move towards 'management by results' means there is an ever increasing pressure for agencies and organisations to be able to tell a clear and powerful results story. This pressure is building across many agencies in Australia, and in particular at the Commonwealth Government level with the introduction of the enhanced Commonwealth performance framework. With this has comes the request for "evidence-based performance stories".

This one-day workshop introduces the concept and method of performance story.

The term 'performance story' was introduced by John Mayne in a paper published in 2004. The encyclopaedia of evaluation defines a performance story as:

Essentially a short report about how a program contributed to outcomes. Although they may vary in content and format, most are short, mention program context and aims, relate to a plausible results chain, and are backed by empirical evidence (Dart and Mayne, 2005).

Performance story reports aim to strike a good balance between depth of information and brevity. They aim to be written in accessible language and help build a credible case about the contribution a program has made towards outcomes or targets. They help teams and organisations to focus on results and also provide a common language for discussing different programs.

This workshop will explore different approaches to performance story, and how performance story reports are developed. It will outline steps to building a report and explore the role of program logic and evidence in developing the report. It will be an interactive and engaging workshop involving case studies and group process.

Who should attend?
This workshop is aimed at anyone who is interested creating or commissioning a performance story at the project, program or organisational level. It caters for beginner to intermediate level. For those people who know of Jess Dart's work with the Most Significant Change technique (MSC) it is important to be clear that this workshop is not about MSC, but about an approach to reporting on results at a whole-of project or program level using multiple lines of evidence.

About the presenter
Jess Dart's professional interests are in evaluation methods, evaluation theory, collaborative approaches, and strategic planning. She has a PhD in program evaluation and an MSc in Sustainable Agriculture. Her doctoral research involved adapting and testing a story-based monitoring and evaluation tool named the 'Most Significant Change' technique (MSC). She went on to co-author the user-guide with Rick Davies. Jess is the founder of Clear Horizon Consulting a medium sized consulting company specialising in evaluation and strategy.
Jess has an extensive experience in performance story approaches. In 2008 to 2012 she championed the 'performance story reporting' pilot process with two divisions of the commonwealth government which led to over 20 performance story reports being written. She also developed a particular approach to documenting and creating performance stories named "Collaborative Outcome Reporting (COR).

Topic: Building a Bridge: A program evaluation utilising the knowledge and skills of community leaders from refugee backgrounds to co-design and facilitate a sensitive evaluation with vulnerable and hard to reach communities.
Date and time: Wednesday, 25 November 2015, from 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Presenter: Sarah Renals and Alie Kennah, Mater Health Services, Queensland
Venue: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane
Registration Online by: Tuesday 24 November 2015 

This is a free event

The challenge to deliver a powerful program evaluation becomes paramount when its recipients are vulnerable and hard to reach and the continuation of services rests on evidence of impact and value.

This presentation demonstrates the essential evaluation elements of trust, insight, capacity building, efficiency and opportunity which overcame significant limitations of time and budget.

It provides a model of undertaking a sensitive evaluation with refugee communities and shows that a high quality, low cost, timely evaluation can provide meaningful evidence to inform funding and policy decisions.

As the in-house evaluator, Sarah worked closely with the project manager and welcomed the knowledge, expertise and understanding of the Refugee Health Development Project Workers (all from refugee backgrounds), who as experienced health leaders were in a position to provide a bridge between their communities and health services.

The participatory evaluation model produced multiple benefits as it:
· mirrored the project values of respect, empowerment and capacity building
· determined the value of the program from perspectives of the refugee communities, refugee health development workers and health service providers
· allowed for 'big picture' evaluation questions which accommodated diversity
· maximised the data collection possible within time and budget constraints
· validated and provided recognition of the role of the Refugee Health Development Project Workers

Sarah and Alie will present perspectives based on their observations as evaluator and program staff respectively.

Note: This seminar was presented at the AES 2015 International Conference in Melbourne.

About the presenters:
Sarah Renals has been employed as an evaluator and project manager with Mater Health Services since 2009. She has close to 20 years' experience working in health sectors in the UK, NZ and AU. She is currently enrolled on the Masters of Evaluation at Melbourne University.

Alie Kennah originates from Liberia and has firsthand experience of being a refugee. Alie has been engaged on multiple projects with Mater Health Services since 2013. He has a Bachelor degree in Human Services and combines his research interest with his passion of community development.

Date and time: Tuesday 24 November 2015, 9:00am - 5:00pm plus drinks and canapes from 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Venue: Queensland University of Technology Gardens Point Campus, Owen J Wordsworth Function Room, Level 12, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD
Cost: Member $110 (inc GST), Non-member (includes 1 year AES membership) $300 (inc GST)
Register online by: 20 November

Overview
This event will launch a new special interest group for the Australasian Evaluation Society focused on evaluation in higher education. It is intended that this special interest group will:
• Provide networking and information sharing opportunities for individuals who are interested in evaluation in higher education.
• Hold a one day symposium each year which will be rotated around the states.
• Hold 3-4 webinars a year to allow exchange of practice and information sharing
• Promote scholarship in evaluation in higher education through establishing writing partnerships between individuals.
• Reach out to other international special interest groups to seek further opportunities to promote evaluation in higher education.

This one day symposium will launch this special interest group and offer participants with an opportunity to hear from a number of leading evaluation experts within higher education. Those interested in participating in this forum will be invited to submit abstracts for individual presentations or panel discussions. The schedule for the day will be shaped by the submissions received. One session that is already planned is for Dr Lyn Alderman to present Reframe: QUT's Evaluation Framework which received a national award in 2014 (ATEM/Campus Review Best Practice Awards in Tertiary Education Management).

Who should attend?

This forum will be of interest to evaluators, planning directors, survey managers, quality assurance specialists, higher education specialists and those interested in learning and teaching indicators, key performance indicators and performance models.

About the presenters
Dr Lyn Alderman - With over 20 years experience in higher education and 10 years focused on evaluation, Dr Lyn Alderman has a wealth of understanding in institution-wide evaluation frameworks, evaluation of teaching, curriculum and performance models, and how to engage in broad and rich stakeholder engagement. Lyn was the sole investigator of an illuminative evaluation into Australian Government policy borrowing and implementation, lead investigator to research Post Occupancy Evaluation (POEs) of education facilities, external evaluator to examine the quality assurance framework of an international university and consultant to reconceptualise the student evaluation framework for a national university. Lyn is the President of the Australasian Evaluation Society (2014 – 2018) and Editor of the Evaluation Journal of Australasia (2012 – present).

Other presenters will be drawn from the interested participants.

Date and time: Friday, 4 December 2015, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Maida Lilley Centre, 1/5 Green Close, Fortitude Valley, 4006 (cnr Constance & Alfred Streets)
Presenter: Carol Vale, Murawin
Register online by: Monday 30 November
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

About the workshop
It is often said that "Indigenous Australians are the most studied people in the country", and whilst there may be an element of truth in that statement, it is also reasonable to note that for the most part evaluations are undertaken by evaluators with varying degrees of cultural competency in relation to engagement with Indigenous communities. The need to increase the number of Indigenous people doing research at all levels of projects is important to ensure that cultural nuances and protocols are captured in the evaluation project.
This workshop will provide an overview of key considerations for doing evaluation in and with Indigenous communities and draw on a number of evaluation frameworks that draws on Indigenous understandings and perspectives and western-constructed evaluation models. The aim of the workshop is to provide participants with insights into stakeholder engagement processes that will enhance their evaluation practice.

The workshop will explore:
• Indigenous stakeholder engagement
• cultural competency continuum
• building capacity of local researchers
• Indigenous worldviews and the overlay of evaluation practices.

Outcomes
At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:
• apply principles of Indigenous stakeholder engagement to their practice
• measure their cultural competence in relation to undertaking evaluation in Indigenous communities
• develop strategies to enhance their evaluation practice in consideration of Indigenous world views.

Who should attend?
Beginner to experienced evaluators, policy advisors and managers looking for techniques to assist with the evaluation processes they use with Indigenous communities.

About the presenter
Carol is a Dunghutti woman from NSW who has extensive hands-on-experience in social research and evaluation. She is Managing Director, of Murawin, a company she jointly established in 2013. Prior to Murawin, Carol had a significant career in the areas of human services and public policy across a range government departments in NSW and Qld. Carol now turns her extensive lived and employment experience to a broader audience, incorporating the international, business and corporates, non-government organisations, communities, individuals and government sectors, to empower all to influence change not just within the Indigenous space but this certainly remains a key focus of her work.

Date and time: Wednesday, 28 October 2015, from 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Presenter: Carla Wilson, Department of Environment and Heritage Protection
Venue: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane
Registration Online by: Tuesday 27 October 2015 

This is a free event

The Department of Environment and Heritage Protection (EHP) recently commissioned an independent evaluation of the Queensland Indigenous Land and Sea Ranger program. The program is managed by EHP and provides funding and other support to Indigenous 'host' organisations to employ Indigenous Land and Sea Rangers to undertake caring for country activities. Following good practice participatory evaluation principles, EHP staff sought to involve the ranger groups as active participants in the evaluation process (e.g. collaborating in the overall design, carrying out the field work, the interpretation of the findings and development of the recommendations, and in the application of the recommendations). This presentation will review the approach adopted in the evaluation, and share some practical observations and conclusions on the successes and challenges of conducting participatory evaluation within a government context, particularly with remote Indigenous communities.

About the presenter

Carla Wilson is a Senior Project Officer with the Queensland Indigenous Land and Sea Ranger Program, part of the Queensland Government's Department of Environment and Heritage Protection. Carla is based in Cairns and is responsible for coordinating the program's monitoring and evaluation framework. Carla also provides direct on-ground support to a number of ranger groups. Carla has a background in social research and evaluation, and has previously worked for the New Zealand government and as an independent research and evaluation consultant. Carla has a strong professional interest in how evaluators working within a government context can better foster participatory and collaborative approaches to evaluation.

Date and time: Wednesday, 23 September 2015, 12.30pm-1.30pm
Location: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Presenter: Professor Luke Connelly, University of Queensland
Register online by: 22 September 2015

This study reports the results of an economic evaluation of an after-hours healthcare service for homeless people in Brisbane, Australia. The study draws on two rich cross-sections of unit-record data collected before and during the operation of the Homeless to Home Healthcare After-Hours Service to estimate the effect of the service on emergency department (ED) presentations and hospital inpatient admissions. Seven econometric count data models are estimated on ED presentations and inpatient admissions, using data obtained from the administration of an instrument called the Vulnerability Index (VI) to hundreds of Brisbane's homeless population in 2010 (before the service was initiated) and in 2013 (when the service was operating). It is estimated that both ED presentations and inpatient admissions in this population fell as a result of the Homeless to Home Healthcare After-Hours Service, resulting in annual cost savings that are conservatively estimated to be of the order of $6.45m-6.9m. Indirect estimates of the magnitude of probable health-related quality-of-life gains (i.e., those derived from the existing literature) suggest that this is a dominant intervention: it not only improves health, but also does so at lower cost. The recent economic evaluation literature suggests that only between eight and 20 per cent of evaluated health care interventions fall into this (dominant) category.

About the Presenter
Luke Connelly is Professor of Health Economics at The University of Queensland, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences. He holds Bachelor, Masters, and Doctoral (PhD) qualifications in Economics from The University of Queensland. He is a former member of the Evaluation Sub-Committee of the Medical Services Advisory Committee (MSAC) and is currently a member of MSAC. He has extensive experience as an academic economist and in the provision of advice to industry and government. He is also an accomplished teacher and was awarded the UQ School of Economics' Distinguished Teaching Award in 2014. His recent work has been published in journals that include Journal of Health Economics, Health Economics, Labour Economics, Journal of Risk and Insurance, Journal of Law and Medicine, Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Social Science and Medicine, Review of Income and Wealth, Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, Oxford Development Studies, Economics and Human Biology, American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and The Lancet.

Date and time: Wednesday, 7 October 2015, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Maida Lilley Centre, 1/5 Green Close, Fortitude Valley, 4006 (cnr Constance & Alfred Streets)
Presenter: Rob Richards, Evidentiary Pty Ltd
Register online by: Monday 28 September
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Introduction
Evaluation and research are critical processes for informing decisions whether they are investment decisions, policy development, program development or on-ground practice decisions. The consequences of these decisions can be irreversible, long term, have large spatial impacts, have detrimental effects on human health and wellbeing or wasteful of resources if not informed by reliable and representative evidence. It is therefore essential that those who are working in the field of evaluation or research have the skills, desire and confidence to be able to recognise good quality evidence from poor quality evidence. If evaluators and researchers can't or don't do this then there is potential for perverse outcomes and detrimental impacts to continue to punctuate our decision making.

This workshop will introduce participants to the role, practicalities and benefits of more systematic approaches to using evidence in evaluation including key interest topics such as:
• The importance of how a question is phrased in influencing the type of evidence and type of analysis that can be undertaken
• The risks of not using sufficient and reliable evidence in the conclusion we draw
• The value of assessing evidence relevance and how to do it
• The importance of assessing evidence quality – do's and don'ts
• Examining cause and effect using evidence

Good evidence contributes to strong evaluation but what is good evidence, how do we get it, how much do we need and how can it most effectively be used? This full day workshop will lead participants through the theory and practical steps for answering these questions.

In any evaluation approach that benefits from the construction of a cause and effect or theory of change model, there can be significant cost and time savings in evaluators and researchers having sound evidence based management skills. Cause and effect models linked to electronic evidence bases of best available evidence can assist with evaluation planning, synthesis and communication enhancing the evaluation's credibility, transparency and rigour.

Background
While accessing large volumes of potentially relevant information is no longer an obstacle due to modern day web based technology, the issue for evaluation practitioners and researchers becomes one of being able to efficiently and effectively search, store, analyse and integrate relevant evidence into the evaluation process.
There is a global expansion of methods for systematically and rapidly reviewing evidence. This is largely being driven by the need for approaches that can meet the time and resource constraints of policy makers and practitioners. It is also being driven by the recognition of the risks involved in not making evidence informed decisions. The management of risk is rapidly becoming the language of evidence based practice in global governments and industry.

Outcomes and Benefits
Participants will receive the following outcomes and benefits by attending this workshop:
• A sound understanding of the theory and practical application of evidence based approaches to improve decision making using current and relevant material and scenarios.
• New confidence in their research techniques and gain competencies in key management skills for professional development.

Learning outcomes include:
• The history and role of evidence based practice
• How to construct a searchable and answerable question
• How to prioritise evidence needs based on risk assessment
• How to develop and conduct a systematic web based search for evidence
• How determine the relevance of evidence to your question
• How to assess the quality of evidence items
• How to establish and use an electronic evidence library
• How to develop and use an evidence based logic model

Previous course participants have indicated skills learnt from the course will benefit their work in the following areas:
• Conducting research to inform program planning, monitoring and evaluation
• Preparing funding submissions
• Undertaking research for Environmental Impact Assessments
• Writing reports, policy advice and recommendations requiring credible evidence based conclusions
• Reduction of risk in strategic and program investment decisions
• Developing best practice guidelines
• Building organisational reputation and credibility

Participants leave with a set of skills they can see the rationale for, the benefits and how to apply them immediately.

About the presenterimage001
Rob Richards has over 25 years experience in environmental management in the public and private sectors. At the commencement of his career he worked as a rangeland ecologist and environmental educator based in far western NSW from 1990 to 2003 for the NSW Government.

In 2009, he co-founded the innovative company Environmental Evidence Australia who pioneered the development and application of evidence based approaches to improve environmental decision making in Australia. In 2010, after completing studies in conducting Systematic Review of environmental evidence in the UK Rob instigated the creation of the first Australian centre of the international Collaboration for Environmental Evidence (CEE).
He is the founding member and leader of the Australian Centre for Evidence Informed Policy and Practice (www.ceip.org.au) and a Trustee Board member of the UK based international Collaboration for Environmental Evidence (environmentalevidence.org). Rob is an active member of several international working Methods Groups including leader of the Systematic Review Impact Monitoring and Evaluation methods group, and member of the Rapid Evidence Review methods group and the Systematic Review Training Group. He is a contributing author of the current CEE International Guidelines for Systematic Review and has authored, supervised and peer reviewed several Systematic Reviews and Review Protocols.

In 2013 Rob founded Evidentiary Pty Ltd, a company that specialises in the use of evidence based approaches for risk reduction in decision making. Rob is passionate about the role of evidence in reducing risk in environmental decision making and Evidentiary commits a large amount of pro bono time training university students and undertaking evidence based research for community groups facing environmental challenges.

Date and time: Wednesday, 26 August 2015, 12.30pm-1.30pm
Location: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Presenter: Stephanie Wyeth, Urbis
Register online by: 25 August 2015

The newly-elected Queensland Government has made a strong commitment to public participation and engagement, as well as delivery of economic and community benefit through 'better planning' for development and property projects, investment in strategic infrastructure and willingness to consider new models for public-private sector partnerships.

Communicating and assessing the likely community benefit, impact or value associated with a project will be critical for proponents, as well as government agencies and decision-makers. For social researchers and evaluators, the challenge will be adapting established methodologies and reporting to better inform development feasibilities, business case and cost-benefit studies.

This seminar will discuss and explore the opportunities and challenges presented by this new policy and political context, and highlight possible approaches to community benefit assessment.

About the presenter
Stephanie Wyeth is one of Queensland's leading social planners with over 20 years' experience across government, NGO, academic and the private sectors. Stephanie applies her strong understanding of government policy, demographic and social change, consumer demand and commercial drivers to ensure clients are able to deliver innovative property, infrastructure and program solutions.

Stephanie's professional practice is informed by her background as both a town planner and community development practitioner in local government where she has profiled and analysed the strengths and challenges of established and emerging communities. Stephanie has worked within a broad range of policy and operational contexts, engaging with technical specialists, government agencies, service providers, local networks, developers and decision-makers.

Date and time: 22 July 2015, 12.30 - 1.30
Topic: Mobilising adaptive work through evaluation in Indigenous communities
Presenter: Carol Vale, Murawin
Venue: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library. Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Register online at aes.asn.au by 21 July 2015

There is no charge for this AES event.

In the world of tackling Indigenous disadvantage changing paradigms is critical. Bringing in concepts and ideas that are grounded in cultural contexts will increase the opportunity for true engagement and this seminar will have this at the core of our discussion.
This seminar will focus on how we bring adaptive leadership into evaluation to support engagement with Indigenous communities. The workshop will look at design and execution of evaluation and explore such issues as the role of organizational culture and leadership in evaluating Indigenous programs and engaging with communities. We will explore issues such as appropriation of voice, what are the elements that contribute to culturally proficient evaluation practice, having the courage to ask difficult questions without fear and identifying opportunities for changing language re measurements for evaluation.

We will explore key questions about improving Indigenous evaluation practice – is there a preferred methodology? And if so, what are the key elements, what are the challenges, what are the opportunities.

About the presenter
Carol Vale is a Dunghutti woman and Managing Director of Murawin, an Indigenous controlled business that works with others to facilitate tough conversations leading to change. Carol has been a senior officer in government and at the forefront of public policy in a career spanning almost three decades. She has extensive experience in a range of areas including Aboriginal affairs, education, housing and child protection. This experience is supported by formal qualifications in public sector management and business administration, leadership, counselling and Indigenous studies. As Managing Director of Murawin, Carol's focus is mobilising adaptive work that contributes to closing the gap on inequality and disadvantage across Australia.

public-forum-emailBanner

Date and time: Tuesday 4 August 2015, 5:30pm - 8:00pm
Chairman: Dr Tracey Arklay, School of Government and International Relations, Griffith University
Venue: Ship Inn Function Room, Griffith Graduate Centre, Building S06, Sidon Street, South Bank
Cost: This is a free event in recognition of the International Year of Evaluation
Register online: at aes.asn.au

Welcome

  • Professor Andrew O'Neil, Head of School of Government and International Relations, Griffith University
  • Dr Marion Norton, Queensland Regional Convenor, Australasian Evaluation Society

Speakers

  • Dr Graham Fraine - DDG, Customer Services, Safety & Regulation, Dept of Transport & Main Roads
    • Are we there yet? Policy successes in road safety and the road ahead
  • Anne Cross - CEO, UnitingCare Queensland
    • More than just outputs: Making a difference for at-risk kids.
  • Professor Ross Homel AO, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Griffith University
    • Scaling up what works: Changing systems to improve wellbeing of children and young people.
  • Kaye Pulsford, Senior Director, Preventive Health Unit, Queensland Health
    • Combating obesity: A complex problem requiring a systems approach.
  • Professor Lesley Chenoweth AO, Professor of Social Work, Head of Campus, Logan, Griffith University
    • Changing policy? Changing lives? Evaluation and evidence in disability.

Do you remember when the annual road toll was 550? Forty years later with more than double the population, we are looking at ways to keep it down to 220. This is not an accident! It has occurred through consistent, targeted, well-designed and fully evaluated public policy – saving the heartache and loss of thousands. Of course, it is not the whole story.

Using this and other public policy successes, the forum panel will discuss techniques in their sector that suggest ways to address current serious issues that our governments and others are tackling.

Get behind the scenes of public policy and consider how it not only responds to, but also shapes public opinion to bring about significant community benefit. How does research and evaluation grow our understanding of effective mechanisms to achieve social and economic goals and continue to improve community wellbeing?

Register online: at aes.asn.au

Note: 2015 has been designated by the UN as the International Year of Evaluation to advocate for and promote evaluation and evidence-based policy making at international, regional, national and local levels. This coincides with the reshaping of the Millennium Goals, which have not been evaluated because countries have not had the capacity to do so. The theme is: Evidence for the world we want: Using evaluation to improve people's lives through better policy making.

Date and time: Tuesday, 14 July 2015. 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Saxons Training Facilities, Level 11, 300 Adelaide Street, Brisbane
Presenter: Dr John Gargani, Founder of Gargani + Company, Inc.  
Register online by: 10 July 2015
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Social return on investment (SROI) is a new and controversial evaluation method. It is widely applied in the UK, Europe, and many international development settings. Demand for it in the US is rapidly growing. What is SROI? It is one application of valuation, representing the value stakeholders place on program impacts in monetary units. Specifically, SROI compares the value of impacts to the cost of producing them. It is strongly associated with social enterprise, impact investing, social impact bonds, value-for-money initiatives, and other efforts that combine business thinking with social betterment. In this hands-on workshop, you will learn the basics of how to conduct an SROI analysis. We will approach the method with a critical eye in order to plan, use, and interpret SROI effectively. You will leave the workshop with a better understanding of how to incorporate SROI into your practice, and how to engage clients and stakeholders in its implementation.

Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• interpret an SROI ratio
• understand how to estimate SROI ratios
• consider the strengths and weaknesses of SROI and how SROI applies to their work
• bring greater critical thinking to the interpretation of SROI reports
• use SROI to give voice to diverse stakeholder groups
• use SROI more effectively for funding decisions

About the presentergargani 13RT small-150x150
Dr John Gargani

John Gargani was recently elected the 2016 President of the American Evaluation Association.

He is President and Founder of Gargani + Company, Inc., a program design and evaluation firm located in Berkeley, California. Alongside supporting non-profit organizations, foundations, corporations, and government agencies achieve their social missions, John regularly writes about evaluation, shares his thoughts on at EvalBlog.com, teaches graduate classes on social entrepreneurship and program design, speaks at conferences around the world, and conducts workshops to train the next generation of evaluators.

Over the past 20 years, his work has taken him to diverse settings, including public housing projects, museums, countries adopting free market economies, and 19th century sailing ships. He has designed innovative social enterprises; directed large-scale randomized trials; and created novel technologies that measure how people think.

John holds three graduate degrees—a Ph.D. in Education from the University of California at Berkeley, where he studied measurement and evaluation; an M.S. in Statistics from New York University's Stern School of Business; and an M.B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business.

 

Date and time: Monday, 29 June 2015, 12.30pm-1.30pm
Location: Community Meeting Room, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Presenters: Adam Allan, Director, SIIQ

The emergence of social impact bonds as an emerging investment class has implications for policy makers and evaluators, with potential to significantly enhance the funding of social services programs. While they have gained traction overseas as a form of social impact investment for some years, Australia has only recently started to pursue this opportunity.

From a policy perspective, social impact bonds offer governments the opportunity to scale up programs, share risk, manage cashflow and reduce overall expenditure with appropriately designed and executed social investment programs.

From an evaluator's perspective, they require greater assurance that quality metrics and measurements are designed to satisfy a new group of investors such as professional investment managers. These include measures of social returns, savings, risk and governance.

About the speaker
Adam Allan is director of Social Impact Investing Queensland (SIIQ), a specialist consultancy that assists the community sector to become outcome and investment ready. From years of experience in financial services and investment banking, he brings extensive knowledge and skill in shaping investment products to match the interests, risk profile and requirements of investors. Investors look at requests for funding very differently from traditional funders. Adam works with an experienced evaluator in the SIIQ team to ensure that evaluation frameworks and tools designed to monitor service outcomes and impacts are aligned to the risk tolerance of particular investors, use their language and meet their expectations. He encourages evaluators to put themselves in the position of investors and to ask new questions and provide new forms of evidence that satisfy the investor that the service concept is robust and that governance and project management are in place to manage risks and deliver the service in accordance with the concept design.

AES AMSRS banner

2015 Queensland AES and AMSRS Joint Evaluation and Social Research Symposium

Date and Time: 25th June, 1:30 pm to 7:00 pm (registration from 1 pm), followed by drinks and canapes
Venue: QUT S Block Gardens Point, Brisbane
Register online by 24 June
Fees (GST inclusive): $70 AES and AMSRS members, $50 student members, $105 non members, $70 student non-members

Governments are often challenged by the need to change the behaviour of large sections of society for community and individual benefit. Typically they adopt a multi-initiative approach including broad population awareness and information, incentives and penalties, and targeted services and programs.

Drawing on evidence of successful past campaigns and policies, the symposium will explore potential instruments for making and measuring community change within the context of serious contemporary issues across health, road safety, employment, community services and more.

Symposium keynotes and workshops will demonstrate methodologies used to research, design, implement and measure the success of policies aimed at having major impacts on behaviour and community outcomes. An expert panel will discuss the value of engaging multi-disciplinary teams with knowledge of public policy, marketing and social measurement.

Making:

Case studies will be used to highlight key learnings and enablers for ensuring formative research and evaluation has the greatest chance of informing and shaping social change. The symposium will discuss how different theories of Behavioural Economics have been implemented and applied in practice.

Measuring:

Once a campaign, program or policy has been rolled out, how do we know it's been successful? Behaviour change and social norms can sometimes take months if not years to take effect. In addition, the symposium will explore what measurement processes have been used to find out:
• which strategy is most effective
• which strategies are co-dependent or mutually exclusive
• whether it Is more effective, for example, to focus on the most urgent, highest consequence cases that are usually the most expensive to treat or on universal and preventative strategies to reduce the incidence of high end cases.

And after the hard work, drinks and hot snacks will be provided to facilitate your networking.

Keynote Speakers, Panelists and Workshop Presenters:

  • Sonya Keep, CEO, Common Ground Queensland
  • Noel Niddrie, MD, Winangali
  • Stephanie Wyeth, Director, Social Planning, Urbis
  • Paul Paulson, ED, Nahri
  • Professor Rebekah Russell-Bennett, Advertising, Marketing and Public Relations, Business School QUT
  • Professor Ciaran O'Faircheallagh, Director, Program on Indigenous and Environment Governance and Capacity, Centre for Governance and Public Policy, Griffith University
  • Sue York, Institute for Social Science Research, University of Queensland
  • Dr Maria Raciti,Senior Lecturer, Marketing, School of Business,University of Sunshine Coast
  • Robert Corrie , Side by Side Consultancy
  • Pam Palmer, Senior Manager, Community Partnerships, Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads
  • Phil Stork, Marketing Manager, Queensland Health
  • Robyn Rutley, Director, TNS

Who should attend:

• Social marketers, social researchers, evaluators - suppliers and buyers

• Policy officers, academics

• Business and Social Science Students

Program

program amsrs aes15

 

Date and time: 27 May 2015, from 12:30 to 1:30pm
Topic: Professional judgement, evaluation and impact assessment: Balancing 'rigour' and 'reality
Presenter: Professor Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh, Centre for Governance and Public Policy', Griffith University
Venue: Community Meeting Room, BRISBANE, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Register online by 26 May 2015
There is no fee for this evaluation seminar.

For evaluators, a key issue involves balancing the need for rigour and comprehensiveness with the realities of limited budgets, tight time frames and client demands. The same issue arises in social impact assessment (SIA), which involves evaluating, and seeking to manage, project or program impacts that have yet to eventuate.
According to the text book, SIA involves establishing baseline social conditions in the area of impact; documenting the character of the impact source; predicting impacts and opportunities; and developing strategies to minimise impacts and maximise opportunities.

In reality, commercial pressures and regulatory time frames may mean there is not enough time to follow this template; reliable base line data may not exist; project or program parameters may shift after the SIA starts; and SIA processes and outcomes can become highly politicised. This seminar highlights the role of professional judgment in maximising SIA rigour and reliability while operating under such 'real world' constraints.

About the Presenter
Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh is Professor of Politics and Public Policy at Griffith University, Brisbane. His research focuses on Indigenous governance especially as it relates to large-scale resource development. For over 20 years he has acted as a negotiator and advisor for Indigenous communities in Australia and Canada. He recently coordinated on behalf of the Kimberley Land Council an Indigenous Impacts Study of the proposed Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Precinct north of Broome in Western Australia, and is currently advising the Autonomous Bougainville Government on the possible reopening of the Bougainville copper mine in Papua New Guinea.

Date: Monday 18 May 2015, 9.00am to 5.00pm
Location: Maida Lilley Centre, Level 1, 5 Green Close, cnr Alfred and Constance Streets, Fortitude Valley 4006
Presenters: Dr Marion Norton and Rachel Eberhard
Register online by: 15 May 2015
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

This one-day workshop will develop your skills to implement an evaluation of a program or service and will explore common issues such as how to measure outcomes. The workshop is designed for staff in government, universities and service provider organisations who have a basic knowledge of program logic and program theory and want to go to the next step in developing an evaluation framework and evaluation plan.

The workshop will:
• review the fundamental concepts of evaluation, program theory and program logic
• create a program logic for a service to address a topical issue
• develop an evaluation framework for a service or policy including performance measures
• identify quantitative and qualitative data to measure service delivery and immediate outcomes
• identify how data collection can fit into daily practice
• consider components and styles of reports to suit various audiences
• develop an evaluation plan and discuss how to engage your organisation in the evaluation process.

There will be time to trouble shoot your own examples and discuss evaluation methodology and tools that suit your context.

Outcomes and benefits
At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:
• apply the fundamental concepts of evaluation
• develop and implement a simple evaluation framework and evaluation plan.

About the presenters

Dr Marion NortonMarion Norton
Marion has managed research projects, evaluations, performance audits and organisational reviews over 20 years in the Queensland public service and has had many roles in and with not-for-profit organisations. She has worked with small businesses and industry leaders to skill workforces to adapt to major structural change.She has a strong interest in improving access to data at project, strategic and organisational levels so that practitioners and managers understand what is working and what to fix and can show their achievements to clients, staff and investors. Marion teaches at the University of Queensland and is the Queensland convenor of the Australasian Evaluation Society.
PhD (education), MPPM, BEd, BA.

Rachel EberhardREberhard
Rachel has over 20 years professional experience working in natural resource management as a scientist, planner, broker and evaluator. Rachel applies her critical thinking skills to diverse project-based work, including strategy development, facilitation and brokerage, and evaluation. She has a particular interest in the design, negotiation and evaluation of cross-sectoral collaborations. Rachel is a PhD scholar researching the evaluation of governance arrangements using realist evaluation methodology.
B.Ag.Sci.,M.Nat.Res., M.Bus.

Date: Monday 18 May 2015, 9.00am to 5.00pm
Location: Maida Lilley Centre, Level 1, 5 Green Close, cnr Alfred and Constance Streets, Fortitude Valley 4006
Presenters: Dr Marion Norton and Rachel Eberhard
Register online by: 15 May 2015
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

This one-day workshop will develop your skills to implement an evaluation of a program or service and will explore common issues such as how to measure outcomes. The workshop is designed for staff in government, universities and service provider organisations who have a basic knowledge of program logic and program theory and want to go to the next step in developing an evaluation framework and evaluation plan.

The workshop will:
• review the fundamental concepts of evaluation, program theory and program logic
• create a program logic for a service to address a topical issue
• develop an evaluation framework for a service or policy including performance measures
• identify quantitative and qualitative data to measure service delivery and immediate outcomes
• identify how data collection can fit into daily practice
• consider components and styles of reports to suit various audiences
• develop an evaluation plan and discuss how to engage your organisation in the evaluation process.

There will be time to trouble shoot your own examples and discuss evaluation methodology and tools that suit your context.

Outcomes and benefits
At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:
• apply the fundamental concepts of evaluation
• develop and implement a simple evaluation framework and evaluation plan.

About the presenters

Dr Marion NortonMarion Norton
Marion has managed research projects, evaluations, performance audits and organisational reviews over 20 years in the Queensland public service and has had many roles in and with not-for-profit organisations. She has worked with small businesses and industry leaders to skill workforces to adapt to major structural change.She has a strong interest in improving access to data at project, strategic and organisational levels so that practitioners and managers understand what is working and what to fix and can show their achievements to clients, staff and investors. Marion teaches at the University of Queensland and is the Queensland convenor of the Australasian Evaluation Society.
PhD (education), MPPM, BEd, BA.

Rachel EberhardREberhard
Rachel has over 20 years professional experience working in natural resource management as a scientist, planner, broker and evaluator. Rachel applies her critical thinking skills to diverse project-based work, including strategy development, facilitation and brokerage, and evaluation. She has a particular interest in the design, negotiation and evaluation of cross-sectoral collaborations. Rachel is a PhD scholar researching the evaluation of governance arrangements using realist evaluation methodology.
B.Ag.Sci.,M.Nat.Res., M.Bus.

Date and time: Thursday, 21 May 2015, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Maida Lilley Centre, 1/5 Green Close, Fortitude Valley 4006 (cnr Alfred & C onstance Streets)
Presenters: Dr Samantha Abbato, Samantha Abbato and Associates
Register online by: 18 May 2015
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Evidence-based practice depends on skilled practitioners and policy makers to be able to extract and interpret and apply key information from evaluation reports. However, understanding evaluation reports, their limitations and language – and then making good use of the findings are essential skills in order to benefit from the investment in the evaluation process. This workshop provides the link between the evaluator and the evaluation user: users will learn what to look for and what questions to ask and evaluators will learn how to make their reports more accessible.

The purpose of this workshop is to increase the capacity of people to critically understand evaluation reports and papers and to enable them to make sound decisions on the application of evaluation findings to evidence based decision making.

Through a combination of short lectures, individual and group learning activities, provision of templates and checklists to support all learning styles, the facilitator will guide participants through key stages and strategies of understanding evaluation reports and papers.

The sessions will include the following:

1. Making a start: How to approach an evaluation report through a critical lens of optimistic scepticism, asking the right questions and using proven strategies for step by step review without getting lost in detail or technical terminology.

2. Demystifying methodology: How to develop a visual map of the methodology and methods used and identify technical terms and concepts that require you to source their meaning and understanding the concepts

3. Understanding the key stages of methods and differences between qualitative and quantitative methods at each stage: How to break evaluation methods down into the three main stages of (a) sampling, (b) instruments and data collection and (c) analysis. This includes learning about the key difference between quantitative and qualitative methods, things to look for at each stage and how these impact results and conclusions.

4. Putting it all together: Through practical activities, the critical approach will be reinforced, enabling participants make better informed decisions on the appropriate and effective use of the evaluation report findings.

Who should attend
This workshop is designed for those who commission evaluations and/or need to use evaluation findings to make policy and practice decisions. It will also be helpful for evaluators who want to understand either quantitative or qualitative research methods better and enhance their communication with evaluation clients. The workshop is pitched at people who have a basic understanding of evaluation language, logic and frameworks.

About the presenterDSCF4423
Samantha Abbato is a Brisbane based evaluator with more than twenty years of experience and strong methodological expertise across a range of qualitative and quantitative disciplines. In the past she has held university lecturing positions and published papers in both qualitative methods (epidemiology) and qualitative methods separately. As a consultant, she regularly applies a mixed-methods approach and regularly uses both stories (case study) and pictures (visualisation of quantitative methods) in her work. Sam's academic background includes a PhD and MPH Public Health (Epidemiology/Biostatistics, UC Berkeley), anthropology and mathematics. Major areas of expertise in evaluation include: Public Health, Communities and work with Indigenous, migrant and refugee populations.

Date and time: Tuesday, 21 April 2015, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Salvation Arm Centre, 32/54 Hayward Street, Stafford
Presenter: Ellen Vasiliauskas, Director, d-sipher
Register online by: 14 April 2015
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Presenting results so stakeholders easily understand them is critical aspect of successful evaluations. This workshop will develop your skills to grab the attention of your stakeholders and communicate evaluation findings effectively through visualising data.

You will discover the good and bad of data visualisation and learn the key principles to apply to reporting and presenting quantitative and qualitative results. The benefits of these techniques are many: results are more accessible, the meaning of complex information is clearer, and decision makers can grasp the key information more quickly.

Content
Participants will learn methods and processes of data visualisation in multiple applications. Techniques include modelling, developing visual maps, the use of metaphor and storytelling, use of colour to convey meaning, graphical presentation, mind maps and storyboards.

The workshop will explore:
• definitions of data visualisation as it applies to evaluation
• the case for data visualisation and the needs of stakeholders
• how audiences absorb data and information
• how data becomes clear, intuitive and even fun
• what makes for clear data visualisation and what makes things murky
• rules for charts and simple quantitative presentation formats, including Excel
• options for visualising qualitative data.

You are invited to bring quantitative or qualitative data visualisations to discuss. Examples will be selected and the techniques learnt will be applied in group exercises. The group will discuss and explore the case for data visualisation and the needs of stakeholders. Participants should bring a laptop in order to undertake exercises in Excel. Learning strategies will include individual and group exercises.

Who should attend?
Beginners and those new to data visualisation will benefit from this workshop.

This workshop was well-received by attendees at the 2013 and 2014 AES Conferences.

Numbers are strictly limited in order to ensure all attendees receive personal attention.

About the presenter
Ellen Vasiliauskas is the Director of d-sipher, an award-winning Queensland-based consultancy firm specialising in evaluation to inform improvements to business, programs, service delivery and organisational development. She has more than 30 years experience in undertaking major government evaluation projects and has a special interest in regional evaluation, mixed-method evaluations and modelling complex projects to assist decision-makers in applying evaluation outcomes. Ellen was a judge for seven years on the Awards Committee for the AES Awards for Excellence in Evaluation, and has won several awards, including the AES 2005 Evaluation Development Award and the AES 1998 Best Public Sector Evaluation for her work with the Australian Defence Force.

Date and time: Tuesday 7 April 2015 (new date), 12.30pm-1.30pm
Location: Tiered Theatrette, Brisbane Square Library, Ground Level, 266 George Street, Brisbane 4000
Presenters: Ellen Vasiliauskas, Director, d-sipher

Often, it is hard to hold the attention of decision makers and you have a very short window in which to express complex information. How you present your information is the key to communicating your evaluation findings and engaging your stakeholders.

This seminar will show you how to translate both qualitative and quantitative data from text to pictures and diagrams and will give you tips on what will work and what to avoid. This is a useful skill for everyone trying to report and present results clearly and simply without losing the important nuances and depth of meaning.

The seminar will be followed in April by a full day workshop on data visualisation which was very well received at the National AES Conference in Darwin last year.

About the presenter
Ellen Vasiliauskas is the Director of d-sipher, an award-winning Queensland-based consultancy firm specialising in evaluation to inform improvements to business, programs, service delivery and organisational development. She has more than 30 years experience in undertaking major government evaluation projects and has a special interest in regional evaluation, mixed-method evaluations and modelling complex projects to assist decision-makers in applying evaluation outcomes. Ellen was a judge for seven years on the Awards Committee for the AES Awards for Excellence in Evaluation, and has won several awards, including the AES 2005 Evaluation Development Award and the AES 1998 Best Public Sector Evaluation for her work with the Australian Defence Force.

Date and time: Monday, 23 March 2015, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Ground Floor Conference Rooms, 63 George St, Brisbane
Presenters: Duncan Rintoul and Vanessa Hood
Register online by: 16 March 2015
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

This one-day course has been custom designed for people who want to commission better evaluations. It is for people with a role in planning, commissioning and managing evaluations who want to gain knowledge, and consolidate their understanding, of:

  • key concepts in evaluation
  • principles and steps in planning and implementing evaluation projects
  • different types of evaluation and how they can be used policy, strategy and projects? practice
  • elements that make up a good evaluation proposal, including scope writing
  • techniques for developing and prioritising evaluation questions
  • consultation, stakeholder engagement and governance in commissioning evaluations
  • factors that influence the scale, budget and timeframe of an evaluation
  • assessment of evaluation proposals and the procurement process
  • ethical conduct and risk management in evaluation
  • managing evaluation consultancies
  • optimising the impact and use of evaluation for project teams and other stakeholders.

The training is interactive and hands-on, with lots of practical examples and group activities through the day to keep the blood pumping and the brain ticking.

It will provide you with tools that you can start using immediately!

Who should attend?
Anyone working in government, the community sector or business who has a role in planning, commissioning or managing evaluations. No prior experience in evaluation is required.

The course is limited to 20 participants. If the course books out, it will be run again.

About the presentersrintoul
Duncan Rintoul has over 15 years' research and evaluation experience across a broad range of policy areas, organisational settings and methodologies. He runs a consulting practice (www.rooftopsocial.com) and has previously held roles at the University of Wollongong, NSW Department of Family and Community Services, Urbis and Wesley Mission. Duncan has run popular introductory courses in evaluation for the AES, the Australian Market and Social Research Society, and the NSW Centre for Road Safety. He was on the Urbis team that won the AES Award for Excellence in Evaluation Project of the Year in 2011.

V Hood April 2011Vanessa Hood is a skilled facilitator and evaluator with over 15 years' experience. She has worked on capability building and behaviour change projects in a range of contexts, including agriculture and sustainability.
She is passionate about working with people in group and individual settings. She loves exploring creative ways of engaging with people, including using applied improvisation.

Date: Thursday 5 March 2015, 1.30pm to 5.00pm
Location: Maida Lilley Centre, Level 1, 5 Green Close, Fortitude Valley, cnr Alfred and Constance Streets.
Presenters: Dr Marion Norton and Rachel Eberhard
Register online by: 27 February 2015
Fees: Members $220, Non-members $302.50, Student member $110, Student non-member $151.00

This half-day workshop is particularly aimed at practitioners and program managers who need to demonstrate to their Board or funding body that the program is achieving what is intended, as well as contract managers, policy officers and designers who are responsible for achieving policy and program outcomes.

The workshop will suit staff:

  • with limited knowledge of how to evaluate a program
  • in any industry sector

What it will cover:

  • Getting started – planning and preparing
  • What data to collect
  • Simple tools to use in-house
  • How to use your findings
  • Resources and support.

The workshop will develop skills through practical examples to:

  • define the impacts intended by the program
  • identify factors influence what actually happens
  • identify different perspectives to consider
  • gather quality data
  • interpret findings.

This workshop will be followed by a second half-day workshop: Evaluation Fundamentals Part 2 on 19 May. Half-day fees as listed above will apply.

Workshop facilitators:MNorton
Marion Norton
Marion has over 20 years experience in designing and delivering complex evaluations and organisational reviews, mostly in the human services sector. Marion has worked in senior roles in state government and has undertaken varied roles with not-for-profit organisations. Marion teaches in the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work at the University of Queensland.

REberhardRachel Eberhard
Rachel has over ten years experience as an independent consultant in natural resource management. Rachel has undertaken a number of evaluations of water quality partnerships in South East Queensland and the Great Barrier Reef catchments. Rachel is a PhD scholar researching the evaluation of governance arrangements using realist evaluation methodology.

Date and time: Friday 1 August 2014, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm (registration from 8.30am)
Venue: Maida Lilley Centre, Level 1, 5 Green Close (cnr Constance and Alfred Streets), Fortitude Valley 4006
Presenter: Ellen Vasiliauskas, d-sipher
Register online by: 28 July 2014
Fees: AES Members $440, Non-members $605, Student AES member $220, Student non-member $302.50 (GST inclusive)

Presenting results so that they are easily understood by stakeholders and attract their attention is a critical aspect of successful evaluations. This workshop will develop participants' capability to communicate evaluation findings and engage with their stakeholders through data visualisation.

Ellen will guide participants through the good and bad of data visualisation and show how it applies to reporting quantitative and qualitative data. Participants will learn techniques including modeling, visual maps, metaphor and storytelling, colour to convey meaning, graphical presentation, mind maps and storyboards.

The benefits of these techniques are many: more effective communication of results, gaining clarity of large amounts of complex data and information, and engaging with and holding the attention of decision makers.

Participants are invited to bring their quantitative or qualitative data visualisations to discuss. Examples will be selected and the techniques learnt will be applied in group exercises. The group will discuss and explore the case for data visualisation and the needs of stakeholders. Learning strategies include individual and group exercises.

Outcomes
At the end of the workshop, participants will understand:

  • how data visualisation applies to evaluation
  • the case for data visualisation and the needs of stakeholders
  • how audiences absorb data and information
  • how data becomes clear, intuitive and even fun
  • what makes for clear data visualisation and what makes things murky
  • rules for charts and simple quantitative presentation formats
  • options for visualising qualitative data.

Who should attend?
Beginning evaluators and those new to data visualisation will benefit from this workshop.

About the presenter
Ellen Vasiliauskas is the Director of d-sipher, an award-winning Queensland-based consultancy firm specialising in evaluation to inform improvements to business, programs, service delivery and organisational development. She has more than 30 years experience in undertaking major government evaluation projects and has a special interest in mixed-method evaluations and modelling complex projects to assist decision-makers in applying evaluation outcomes. Ellen is currently a judge on the Awards Committee for the AES Awards for Excellence in Evaluation, and has won several awards, including the AES 2005 Evaluation Development Award and the AES 1998 Best Public Sector Evaluation for her work with the Australian Defence Force.

cta_eventscalendar_final