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ImprovingEvaluation

NSW

Date and time: Tuesday 4th June 2019, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Mariner A room at Adina Apartment Hotel Sydney Darling Harbour, Ground Floor, 55 Shelley Street, Sydney, NSW, 2000
Facilitator: David Marchant
Register online by: 28 May 2019
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Date and time: Wednesday 27th March 2019, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Bathurst room at Adina Apartment Hotel Sydney Town Hall, 511 Kent Street, Sydney NSW 2000
Facilitator: Carina Calzoni
Register online by: 20 March 2019
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Purpose of Workshop

This workshop introduces the program logic / theory of change concept and lays out a step by step process for creating a logic/theory of change model. A program logic/ theory of change focuses not just on what, and how a project is trying to achieve change but also on ‘the who’ will be changing. The workshop includes discussion of how program logic / theory of change can be used for program design and how it can be used to provide the structure for monitoring and evaluation plans.

Date and Time: Thursday 21st March 2019 4.00 - 5.30pm (followed by networking drinks from 5.30 pm, basement bar area Martin Place GPO)
Topic: Measuring outcomes and impact validly and reliably. Amplify - a case study
Presenter: Lena Etuk, Manager Amplify Project, Centre for Social Impact, UNSW
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, Sydney
Registrations close: 18 March 2019

Date and Time: Thursday 2nd May 2019 4.00 - 5.30pm (followed by networking drinks from 5.30 pm, basement bar area Martin Place GPO)
Topic: Harnessing the promise and avoiding the pitfalls of machine assisted qualitative analysis
Presenter: Don Sharples, Altometer BI, Jasper Odgers and David Wakelin, ARTD Consultants and Florent Gomez, NSW Department of Finance, Services and Innovation
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, Sydney
Registrations close: 26 April 2019

Due to high demand, we will be repeating this workshop on Wed 20 Feb and registrations are now open.

Date and time: Wednesday 20th February 2019, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Kent room at Adina Apartment Hotel, Sydney Town Hall, 511 Kent Street, Sydney 2000
Facilitator: Charlie Tulloch
Register online by: 14 February 2019
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Purpose of Workshop

This workshop is aimed at those who are new or inexperienced in the evaluation field. Its purpose is to outline the key concepts, terms and approaches that are relevant to commissioning or conducting evaluation projects. The workshop will step through the set of activities that are most often involved in framing, conducting and reporting on evaluation findings. It will also introduce participants to the AES Evaluators’ Professional Learning Competency Framework, along with further sources for new evaluators to continue building their skills and knowledge in this field.

Please note that this workshop on Tues 19 Feb is FULL. However, due to the high demand for this workshop, we will be repeating it on Wed 20 Feb and registrations are now open.

Date and time: Tuesday 19th February 2019, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Kent room at Adina Apartment Hotel, Sydney Town Hall, 511 Kent Street, Sydney 2000
Facilitator: Charlie Tulloch
Register online by: 12 February 2019
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Purpose of Workshop

This workshop is aimed at those who are new or inexperienced in the evaluation field. Its purpose is to outline the key concepts, terms and approaches that are relevant to commissioning or conducting evaluation projects. The workshop will step through the set of activities that are most often involved in framing, conducting and reporting on evaluation findings. It will also introduce participants to the AES Evaluators’ Professional Learning Competency Framework, along with further sources for new evaluators to continue building their skills and knowledge in this field.

Date and Time: Thursday 6th December 2018 4.00 - 5.30pm (followed by early Christmas networking drinks from 5.30pm, basement bar area Martin Place GPO)
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, Sydney
Presenters: 4-5 presenters from various sectors will provide a range of perspectives from their 2018 conference experience
Registrations close: Tuesday 4th December 2018

This is a free event organised by the NSW Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in New South Wales and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and time: Tuesday 4th December 2018, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Mariner B room at Adina Apartment Hotel Sydney Darling Harbour, Ground Floor, 55 Shelley Street, Sydney, NSW, 2000
Facilitators: Duncan Rintoul & Vanessa Hood
Register online by: 26 November 2018
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Purpose of Workshop

This one-day course has been custom designed for people who want to commission better evaluations. It is for people with a role in planning, commissioning and managing evaluations. It is suitable for beginners through to those with a few years' experience. 

The training is interactive and hands-on, with lots of practical examples and group activities through the day to keep the blood pumping and the brain ticking. It will provide you with tools that you can start using immediately..

Date and Time: Thursday 25th October 2018 4.00 - 5.30pm (followed by networking drinks from 5.30pm, basement bar area Martin Place GPO)
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, Sydney
Presenters:

  • Joshua Greenwood, Director, Outcome Budgeting, NSW Treasury
  • Ben Gales, Executive Director, Economic Strategy Division, NSW Treasury
  • Michael Di Francesco, former ANZSOG Associate Professor in Public Sector Management
Facilitated by: Florent Gomez, Manager, Planning and Evaluation, NSW Department of Finance

Registrations close: Friday 19th October 2018

This is a free event organised by the NSW Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in New South Wales and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and Time: Thursday 30th August 2018 4.00 - 5.30pm (followed by networking drinks from 5.30pm, basement bar area Martin Place GPO)
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, Sydney. Please note that foyer renovations underway – entrance in the middle of the black hoarding
Facilitators: Stuart Loveday, CEO, Hepatitis NSW
Registrations close: Tuesday 28th August 2018

This is a free event organised by the NSW Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in New South Wales and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and Time: Thursday 26th July 2018 4.00 - 5.30pm (followed by networking drinks from 5.30pm, basement bar area Martin Place GPO)
Topic: Evaluation in complex settings: taking a systems approach with an eye to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, Sydney. Please note that foyer renovations underway – entrance in the middle of the black hoarding
Facilitators: Michael Reid, The Keyline Group
Registrations close: Tuesday 24th July 2018

This is a free event organised by the NSW Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in New South Wales and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and Time: Thursday 28th June 2018 4.00 - 5.30pm (followed by networking drinks from 5.30pm, basement bar area Martin Place GPO)
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, Sydney. Please note that foyer renovations underway – entrance in the middle of the black hoarding
Facilitators: Bryony Mika, Ruth McCausland and Sarah Meikle from the AES NSW Regional Network Committee
Registrations close: Tuesday 26th June 2018

This is a free event organised by the NSW Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in New South Wales and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Workshop title: Designing and Implementing a Monitoring and Evaluation System
Dates and time: 30th July, 31st July, 1st August, 2nd August 2018 (4 days) 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am) each day

  • Monday 30th July: Introduction to Designing and Implementing a Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation System; 
  • Tuesday 31st July: Planning for Monitoring and Evaluation functions; 
  • Wednesday 1st August: Developing System Capabilities for Data Collection and Analysis; 
  • Thursday 2nd August: Developing System Capabilities for Reflection and Reporting for Learning and Program Improvement

People can choose to participate in the full program or part of the program dependent upon their experience and needs

Location: Mariner B room at Adina Apartment Hotel Sydney Darling Harbour, Ground Floor, 55 Shelley Street, Sydney, NSW, 2000
Facilitators: Anne Markiewicz and Ian Patrick
Registrations close:  Friday 20 July 2018
Fees (GST inclusive): For all 4 workshops: Members $1,650, Non-members $2,270. For day workshops: Members $440, Non-members $605 (per day)

About the 4-day Intensive Workshop

Designing and implementing a Monitoring and Evaluation System for a program or an organisation is becoming an increasingly important task required to support the assessment of agreed results and to aid organisational learning for program improvement. A robust and well-considered Monitoring and Evaluation System is also required to determine the scope and parameters of routine monitoring and periodic evaluation processes; to identify how monitoring and evaluation data will be collected and analysed; and to determine how data will be used to inform learning and reporting for accountability, program improvement and decision-making. The Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (PGPA) Act (2013) and the Department of Finance Resource Management Guide No.131 ‘Developing Good Performance Information’ (April 2015) affirm the importance of planning to identify program intentionality and to outline how a program’s performance will be measured and assessed.

This workshop draws on the text book ‘Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks’ (SAGE, 2016) authored by Anne Markiewicz and Ian Patrick. It presents a clear and staged conceptual model for the systematic development and implementation of an M&E System. The workshop has been developed with four separate, but inter-related components, with one presented each day:

  • Day One (Mon 30 July) provides an introduction to the principles of designing and implementing a participatory monitoring and evaluation system based on program theory and program logic
  • Day Two (Tues 31 July) identifies how to plan for monitoring and evaluation functions
  • Day Three (Wed 1 August) focuses on data collection and analysis processes
  • Day Four (Thurs 2 August) covers learning and reporting for program improvement and decision-making.

The four day intensive training program is structured in such a way that participants can enrol in all four days, thereby providing a comprehensive guide to developing an M&E System. Alternatively, participants can enrol in any one or more of the training days depending on their prior experience, needs and orientation. Each day will be structured as a stand-alone event in terms of content.

This modular training approach should appeal to participants who have already attended a two-day ‘Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks’ workshop delivered by Anne Markiewicz or Ian Patrick and would like to receive an extension through more content provided on the implementation of monitoring and evaluation plans focused on processes of data collection, analysis, learning and reporting (Days 3&4).

Date and Time: Wednesday 2nd May 2018 12:30 to 1:30 pm
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, Sydney. Please note that foyer renovations underway – entrance in the middle of the black hoarding
Facilitators: Florent Gomez, NSW Department of Finance and Jade Maloney, ARTD
Registrations close: Friday 27 April 2018

This is a free event organised by the NSW Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in New South Wales and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

About:

Originating from the IT world, agile project management is now widespread across private and public organisations alike. Caroline Heider, Director of the World Bank Independent Evaluation Group made a case in 2016 for Agile Evaluation. Can evaluation be more agile? What risks and challenges would that bring? What opportunities?

Read the article and come share your thoughts with your fellow Evaluation enthusiasts!

Registration: Attendance is free, and open to AES members and non-members alike. However, it is necessary to register to attend.


 

Date and Time: Wednesday 11th April 2018 4:00 to 5:30 pm
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, Sydney. Please note that foyer renovations underway – entrance in the middle of the black hoarding
Speakers: Andrew Hawkins, ARTD Partner
Registrations close: Friday 6 April 2018

This is a free seminar organised by the NSW Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in New South Wales and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

About: Andrew will present his innovative approach to developing program logic. The presentation will be followed by a facilitated interactive discussion which will be lively and fun. The session is suitable for novices as well as those experienced with program logic!

Registration: Attendance is free, and open to AES members and non-members alike. However, it is necessary to register to attend.

Seminar flyer


 

Date and time: Wednesday 11th - Thursday 12th April 2018, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Outer Space room at Vibe Hotel Sydney, 111 Goulburn Street Sydney 2000
Presenter: Gill Westhorp
Register online by: Wednesday 4th April 2018
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

Workshop title: Skill Building in Evaluation: Survey Design and Interviewing Skills
Date:
Thursday 22nd March 2018
Times - Morning workshop: 8.30am for a 9am start to 12.30pm, concluding with lunch until 1.30pm
Times - Afternoon workshop: commencing at lunch from 12.30, 1.30pm - 5.00pm
Location: Kent room at Adina Apartment Hotel, Sydney Town Hall, 511 Kent Street, Sydney 2000
Presenters: Survey Design: Klas Johansson and Jasper Odgers: Interviewing Skills: Kerry Hart and Jade Maloney
Register online by: Friday 16th March 2018
Fees (GST inclusive): Both workshops: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50
One workshop: Members $231, Non-members $396, Student member $122, Student non-member $198

Date and time: Friday 23rd February 2018, 9am to 4:30pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Conference room at National Centre of Indigenous Excellence (NCIE), 166-180 George St, Redfern NSW 2016
Presenter: Carina Calzoni, Clear Horizon
Register online by: 16 February 2018
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Many people fear evaluation because they think it’s all about being judged. But when done well evaluation provides useful feedback to aid in decision-making and improves projects, ultimately leading to positive social change. This 1 day workshop introduces participants to basic concepts related to evaluating projects and programs. The workshop is designed to de-mystify the evaluation process exploring such topics as: fit for purpose evaluation processes and approaches; interpreting data and producing findings; engaging with stakeholders; the nature and use of evaluation; ethics in evaluation; and key issues and trends in the field of evaluation. Participants will be equipped to develop the right evaluation strategy to suit an organisations program needs, within budget and to satisfy information and reporting needs.

Date and time: Thursday 2 November 4.00 - 5:30 pm
followed by early Christmas networking drinks from 5.30pm, basement bar area Martin Place GPO
Presenters:
- Sharon Valks - Project Coordinator Data and Evaluation, Cancer Programs Division, Cancer Council NSW
- Kath Vaughan – Principal Consultant & Owner, K2 Strategies
- Alexandra Ellison – Senior Consultant, ARTD (Emerging New Talent Award at AES 2017)
- Ben Barnes - Director, Evaluation and Major Projects, Centre for Education Statistics and Evaluation, NSW Department of Education
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, SYDNEY
(NB: foyer renovations currently underway - entrance is in the middle of the black hoarding)
Register online by: Tuesday 31st October 2017
More information: Jen Davis - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This is a free seminar organised by the NSW branch of the AES. Our seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in New South Wales and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES.

This seminar will be a discussion of the Canberra 2017 AES Conference highlights. Speakers are from state and federal government and the private and NGO sector. Each will give a quick presentation of their personal highlights from the conference, and any themes they discerned across the conference. Interaction, questions and discussion will be encouraged! The seminar will be of interest to both those who did and those who did not attend the conference.

We are also keen to hear from you about possible topics for subsequent seminars, and any other local members services you would like the AES to be providing.


 

Date and time: Monday 30th October 2017, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Sussex Room at Adina Apartment Hotel Sydney Town Hall, 511 Kent Street. Sydney 2000
Presenter: Ian Patrick, Ian Patrick and Associates
Register online by: Tuesday 24th October 2017
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50
Level: Intermediate level

Purpose of Workshop

The workshop will provide participants with insight into theory based approaches to evaluation, and specifically into the role of Program Theory and Program Logic to provide a clear understanding, focus and direction to the practice of evaluation. The use of Program Theory and Program Logic will be clearly detailed within a staged conceptual model, with guidance provided on how they can be applied within the planning and implementation of an evaluation.

Areas covered in the workshop include the use of Program Theory and Program Logic to:

  • Identify the expected cause and effect relationships within a program, and the critical assumptions which underpin whether anticipated change occurs.
  • Establish relationships between the more operational constructs of inputs, activities, outputs, outcomes, and impacts as they apply to a program
  • Identify critical areas of focus for monitoring and evaluation including determining evaluation questions across different evaluation domains

The role of stakeholders in the development of the Program Theory and Program Logic and ways to promote their participation will be a point of emphasis. The workshop will consider how monitoring and evaluation activities can establish the validity of the Program Theory and Program Logic, and assist in making adjustments to these models as a program matures or understandings about its identity change. Constraints and limitations in the use of Program Theory and Program Logic will also be identified, together with common pitfalls in implementation and means to address these.

Date and time: 28 June 2017, 9am to 5:00pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Forum Room One at Hyde Park Forum Conference Centre. Level 1, 271 Elizabeth Street, Sydney NSW 2000
Presenter: Carina Calzoni
Register online by: 22 June 2017
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50 

Program logic is a simplified model of expected cause-and-effect relationships between activities, immediate changes, intermediate outcomes and final outcomes. This workshop introduces the program logic concept and lays out a step by step process for creating a logic model. The workshop concludes with an overview of how this logic model can be used for program design and to be the spine of a monitoring, evaluation, reporting and improvement framework.

Course Outcomes

By the end of this course attendees should be able to:

  • have the confidence and ability to develop a simple program logic model
  • understand how program logic can be used for planning and for monitoring and evaluation
Benefits to your organisation
  • projects will be outcome focused
  • provides the organisation with a framework for evaluating the impact and effectiveness of projects
  • KPI and organisational performance monitoring frameworks can be better aligned to projects achievements
Benefits to you
  • understand the uses of program logic and the key concepts
  • be able to build a simple program logic model for your project
  • know how program logic is useful for project planning, monitoring and evaluation 

About Carina Calzoni

Carina is enthusiastic and passionate about program design, monitoring and evaluation with over 15 years professional experience in evaluation working for State Government and as a consultant. She has facilitated over 50 program logic workshops and prepared over 30 design and evaluation frameworks and has led evaluations across a range of sectors including environment, agriculture, community development, mental health and local government. She understands the policy and program cycle and appreciates the role evaluation plays in this context. Carina is the current Managing Director of Clear Horizon WA and the AES representative for WA. 

Date and Time: Thursday 8th June 2017 4:00 to 5:30 pm
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, Sydney
Speakers: Kylie Valentine, Associate Professor, Social Policy Research Centre and Peter Ryan, Principal Policy Officer, NSW Premier and Cabinet
Registrations close: Wednesday 7th June 6:00 pm (places are limited so please book early to avoid disappointment)

About: This seminar will discuss the Keep Them Safe Outcomes Evaluation.
With the theme of exemplar evaluations, the seminar will look at the approach and characteristics of this work that stands out, and why it won AES Evaluation of the Year, 2015. The session will look at its design for use by the client (government), and the methods used to triangulate outcomes for a whole-of-system change to the child protection system.

Registration: Attendance is free, and open to AES members and non-members alike. However, it is necessary to register to attend.

More information: Ben Barnes This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Date and Time: Wednesday 30th May 2018 4.00 - 5.30pm (followed by networking drinks from 5.30pm, basement bar area Martin Place GPO)
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, Sydney. Please note that foyer renovations underway – entrance in the middle of the black hoarding
Facilitators: Greg Masters and Keren Winterford from the AES NSW Regional Network Committes
Registrations close: Monday 28 May 2018

This is a free event organised by the NSW Regional Network Committee of the AES. Our seminar series provides an opportunity for you to meet with AES members and others in New South Wales and to share and learn from the experiences of fellow evaluators. Members are encouraged to bring along colleagues with an interest in the topic even if they are not yet members of the AES. Please pass this onto your colleagues and networks.

Date and time: Thursday, 23 March 2017, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Spring Cove Room, Novotel Sydney Central, 169-179 Thomas Street, Sydney
Presenter: Dr Jess Dart, Founder Director, Clear Horizon Consulting Pty Ltd
Register online by: Thursday 16 March 2017
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

The increasing move towards 'management by results' means there is an ever increasing pressure for agencies and organisations to be able to tell a clear and powerful results story. This pressure is building across many agencies Jess Dartin Australia, and in particular at the Commonwealth Government level with the introduction of the enhanced Commonwealth performance framework. With this has comes the request for "evidence-based performance stories".

This one-day workshop introduces the concept and method of performance story.

The term 'performance story' was introduced by John Mayne in a paper published in 2004. The encyclopaedia of evaluation defines a performance story as:

Essentially a short report about how a program contributed to outcomes. Although they may vary in content and format, most are short, mention program context and aims, relate to a plausible results chain, and are backed by empirical evidence (Dart and Mayne, 2005).

Performance story reports aim to strike a good balance between depth of information and brevity. They aim to be written in accessible language and help build a credible case about the contribution a program has made towards outcomes or targets. They help teams and organisations to focus on results and also provide a common language for discussing different programs.

This workshop will explore different approaches to performance story, and how performance story reports are developed. It will outline steps to building a report and explore the role of program logic and evidence in developing the report. It will be an interactive and engaging workshop involving case studies and group process.

Who should attend?
This workshop is aimed at anyone who is interested creating or commissioning a performance story at the project, program or organisational level. It caters for beginner to intermediate level. For those people who know of Jess Dart's work with the Most Significant Change technique (MSC) it is important to be clear that this workshop is not about MSC, but about an approach to reporting on results at a whole-of project or program level using multiple lines of evidence.

About the presenter
Jess Dart's professional interests are in evaluation methods, evaluation theory, collaborative approaches, and strategic planning. She has a PhD in program evaluation and an MSc in Sustainable Agriculture. Her doctoral research involved adapting and testing a story-based monitoring and evaluation tool named the 'Most Significant Change' technique (MSC). She went on to co-author the user-guide with Rick Davies. Jess is the founder of Clear Horizon Consulting a medium sized consulting company specialising in evaluation and strategy.
Jess has an extensive experience in performance story approaches. In 2008 to 2012 she championed the 'performance story reporting' pilot process with two divisions of the commonwealth government which led to over 20 performance story reports being written. She also developed a particular approach to documenting and creating performance stories named "Collaborative Outcome Reporting (COR).

Date and Time: Thursday 17 November 2016 4:00 to 5:30 pm (followed by Christmas networking drinks from 5.30 pm, basement bar area Martin Place GPO)
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, SYDNEY
Registrations close: Monday 14 November 6:00 pm
Presenters:
Jen Davis - Specialist Advisor Evaluation, Australian Human Rights Commission
Rae Fry - Evaluation Analyst, NSW Centre for Road Safety, Transport for NSW
Angela Pearce - Evaluation Manager, Cancer Programs Division, Cancer Council NSW.
Caroline Tomiczek - Associate Director, URBIS

This is a free event

About the seminar
This seminar will be a discussion of the Perth 2016 AES Conference highlights. Speakers are from state and federal government and the private and NGO sector. Each will give a quick presentation of their personal highlights from the conference, and any themes they discerned across the conference. Interaction, questions and discussion will be encouraged! The seminar will be of interest to both those who did and those who did not attend the conference.

Please note that the presentations are available, should you wish to follow up on anything discussed at http://aes.asn.au/previous-conferences/1010-2016-aes-international-conference-perth-presentations.html 

We are also keen to hear from you about possible topics for subsequent seminars, and any other local members services you would like the AES to be providing.

Note: Attendance is free, and open to AES members and non-members alike. However, it is necessary to RSVP.

More information: Jen Davis This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Date and time: Monday 13 and Tuesday 14 February 2017, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Novotel Central Sydney, 169 -179 Thomas Street, Sydney | Map
Presenter: Ian Patrick, Ian Patrick and Associates
Register online by: Wednesday 8 February 2017
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

About the workshop
Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Frameworks are becoming increasingly important for developing an agreed approach to the assessment of results achieved and to aid organisational learning. The M&E Framework identifies expected results, key evaluation questions and the means to answer these questions through routine monitoring and periodic evaluation. It also provides a guide to the implementation of M&E processes over the life of a program or other initiative. Monitoring and evaluation functions are essential to the effective operation of programs and will contribute to the overall value derived from them. M&E Frameworks should support decision-making, allocation of resources and program refinement based on lessons learned.

This workshop follows the structure of the text book ‘Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks’ authored by Dr Ian Patrick and Anne Markiewicz. It will present a clear and staged conceptual model for the systematic development of an M&E Framework. It will examine a range of steps and techniques involved in the design and implementation of the framework; explore potential design issues and implementation barriers; cover the development of a Program Logic; the identification of key evaluation questions; the development of performance indicators; and identification of processes for data collection, on-going analysis and reflection based on data generated.

The facilitator will encourage interactive peer to peer dialogue to share experiences and learning, and also draw on case studies to encourage application of knowledge and skills to evaluation contexts.

Content

  • The importance and function of monitoring and evaluation processes
  • 'Table of Contents' for the development of an M&E Framework – what to do and in what order
  • Design of a viable M&E framework
  • Application of M&E frameworks to programs
  • Key challenges and barriers, and how to address them

Outcomes and Benefits

  • Understanding of an overall structure for the development of a M&E Framework
  • Identification of clear steps and stages involved in the process of development of an M&E Framework, and building knowledge and skills in their implementation
  • Use of case studies to develop key components of an M&E Framework for an initiative
  • Understand how to best support participatory processes in design and implementation of an M&E Framework

Who should attend?
This workshop offers professionals from across government, universities and not for profit and consulting organisations foundation skills in planning for monitoring and evaluation of a program. You would benefit most from the workshop if you have some prior knowledge of evaluation, particularly program theory and program logic and some practical experience with evaluation activities.

About the facilitator: Ian Patrickipatrick 250
Dr. Ian Patrick is an independent consultant and Director of Ian Patrick and Associates. His career as an evaluator extends over around 20 years and includes a focus on both Australia and the Asia Pacific region. He has broad experience across different social sectors such as health, education, law and justice, community development, and human rights and Indigenous issues. Ian has worked with a range of organisations and programs in developing monitoring and evaluation systems, and conducted evaluation-related training programs including on Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks. Ian is an Honorary Senior Fellow, Development Studies Program at the University of Melbourne and was previously the leader of the evaluation practice area at the International NGO Training and Research Centre, UK.

Date and Time: Monday 15 August 4:00 to 5:30 pm (followed by networking drinks from 5.30 pm, at The Westin Hotel, 1 Martin Place)
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, Public Hearing Room 1 and 2, 175 Pitt Street, SYDNEY
Registrations close: Friday 12 August 6:00 pm
Presenter: Professor Patricia Rogers, Australian and New Zealand School of Government, Melbourne

This is a free event

About the seminar
This session looks at some specific innovations in evaluation as well as strategies for innovation, and how they might be adopted. The issues to be addressed include: Where are some of the areas of evaluation practice where innovation is needed? What are some of the recent innovations? How can we as evaluators and managers of evaluation support innovation in evaluation? How can we learn and scaffold learning about new ways of planning, designing, conducting and learning from evaluations?

Note: Attendance is free, and open to AES members and non-members alike. However, it is necessary to register.

More information: George Argyrous This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

For a copy of the presentation please click here

Date and time: Monday 10 and Tuesday 11 October 2106, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Cliftons Sydney, Level 13, 60 Margaret Street, Sydney NSW 2000
Register online by: Wednesday 5 October 2016
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

About the workshop
Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Frameworks are becoming increasingly important for developing an agreed approach to the assessment of results achieved and to aid organisational learning. The M&E Framework identifies expected results, key evaluation questions and the means to answer these questions through routine monitoring and periodic evaluation. It also provides a guide to the implementation of M&E processes over the life of a program or other initiative. Monitoring and evaluation functions are essential to the effective operation of programs and will contribute to the overall value derived from them. M&E Frameworks should support decision-making, allocation of resources and program refinement based on lessons learned.

This workshop follows the structure of the text book ‘Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks’ authored by Dr Ian Patrick and Anne Markiewicz. It will present a clear and staged conceptual model for the systematic development of an M&E Framework. It will examine a range of steps and techniques involved in the design and implementation of the framework; explore potential design issues and implementation barriers; cover the development of a Program Logic; the identification of key evaluation questions; the development of performance indicators; and identification of processes for data collection, on-going analysis and reflection based on data generated.

The facilitator will encourage interactive peer to peer dialogue to share experiences and learning, and also draw on case studies to encourage application of knowledge and skills to evaluation contexts.

Content

  • The importance and function of monitoring and evaluation processes
  • 'Table of Contents' for the development of an M&E Framework – what to do and in what order
  • Design of a viable M&E framework
  • Application of M&E frameworks to programs
  • Key challenges and barriers, and how to address them

Outcomes and Benefits

  • Understanding of an overall structure for the development of a M&E Framework
  • Identification of clear steps and stages involved in the process of development of an M&E Framework, and building knowledge and skills in their implementation
  • Use of case studies to develop key components of an M&E Framework for an initiative
  • Understand how to best support participatory processes in design and implementation of an M&E Framework

Who should attend?
This workshop offers professionals from across government, universities and not for profit and consulting organisations foundation skills in planning for monitoring and evaluation of a program. You would benefit most from the workshop if you have some prior knowledge of evaluation, particularly program theory and program logic and some practical experience with evaluation activities.

About the facilitator: Ian Patrickipatrick 250
Dr. Ian Patrick is an independent consultant and Director of Ian Patrick and Associates. His career as an evaluator extends over around 20 years and includes a focus on both Australia and the Asia Pacific region. He has broad experience across different social sectors such as health, education, law and justice, community development, and human rights and Indigenous issues. Ian has worked with a range of organisations and programs in developing monitoring and evaluation systems, and conducted evaluation-related training programs including on Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks. Ian is an Honorary Senior Fellow, Development Studies Program at the University of Melbourne and was previously the leader of the evaluation practice area at the International NGO Training and Research Centre, UK.

Date and Time: Thursday 16 June 2016, 3:30pm to 5:00pm (followed by networking drinks from 5 pm, at The Vault, 122 Pitt St)
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, SYDNEY
Registrations close: Wednesday 15 June 6:00 pm
Presenters: Stephen Goodall, Associate Professor, Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation, UTS
Sarina Lacey, Director, Health Economics and Policy, The Centre for International Economics

This seminar will discuss some applications of economic evaluation, its benefits and the challenges. The seminar will consider real-life case studies to examine different approaches to economic evaluation and their respective strengths and weaknesses.

Note: Attendance is free, and open to AES members and non-members alike. However, it is necessary to RSVP.

More information: Ben Barnes This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Date and time: Wednesday 1 June 2016, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Saxons Training Facilities, Level 10, 10 Barrack Street, Sydney
Presenter: Dr Ian Patrick, Ian Patrick and Associates
Register online by: Wednesday, 25 May 2016
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Purpose of Workshop
The workshop will provide participants with insight into theory based approaches to evaluation, and specifically into the role of Program Theory and Program Logic to provide a clear understanding, focus and direction to the practice of evaluation. The use of Program Theory and Program Logic will be clearly detailed within a staged conceptual model, with guidance provided on how they can be applied within the planning and implementation of an evaluation.

Areas covered in the workshop include the use of Program Theory and Program Logic to:

• Identify the expected cause and effect relationships within a program, and the critical assumptions which underpin whether anticipated change occurs.
• Establish relationships between the more operational constructs of inputs, activities, outputs, outcomes, and impacts as they apply to a program
• Identify critical areas of focus for monitoring and evaluation including determining evaluation questions across different evaluation domains

The role of stakeholders in the development of the Program Theory and Program Logic and ways to promote their participation will be a point of emphasis. The workshop will consider how monitoring and evaluation activities can establish the validity of the Program Theory and Program Logic, and assist in making adjustments to these models as a program matures or understandings about its identity change. Constraints and limitations in the use of Program Theory and Program Logic will also be identified, together with common pitfalls in implementation and means to address these.

Teaching/Learning Strategies and Resources to be Used

The workshop will incorporate a mix of training methods including presentations, use of case studies, and small group interactive work. There will be ample opportunity for open discussion and questions.

Target group:

This workshop is pitched at an Intermediate level.

The workshop's worth

Theory based approaches to evaluation are increasingly recognised as having a core role in evaluation, and their use is seen as a means to resolve debates regarding choice of an appropriate evaluation methodology. The importance of a theory based approach is also reinforced within recent Australian government legislation and guidelines. The Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act (2013) and Resource Management Guide 131 'Developing Good Performance Information' (Department of Finance, April 2015) highlight the important place of logic models as representations of how a program's purpose will be met, the chain of reasoning that connects critical elements to that purpose, and the performance information needed to tell an effective 'performance story'. With a blend of conceptual material and practice, the workshop will position participants to make effective use of Program Theory and Program Logic. The workshop contents are also closely related to the recent SAGE publication, Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks, of which Ian Patrick is joint author.

About the Traineripatrick 250

Dr. Ian Patrick is a self-employed consultant undertaking evaluation related roles in both Australia and the Asia-Pacific region. Ian has considerable experience as a trainer and has delivered workshops in areas such as Developing M&E Frameworks, Introduction to M&E, Advanced M&E, Impact Assessment, and Participatory Evaluation. This experience crosses Australia, New Zealand, United States, UK, Ireland and a range of developing countries particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. Ian is an Honorary Senior Fellow with the School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Melbourne.

Date and time: Monday, 2 May 2016, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Saxons Training Facilities, Level 10, 10 Barrack Street, Sydney 
Presenter: Dr Jess Dart, Founder Director, Clear Horizon Consulting Pty Ltd
Register online by: Tuesday 26 April 2016
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

The increasing move towards 'management by results' means there is an ever increasing pressure for agencies and organisations to be able to tell a clear and powerful results story. This pressure is building across many agencies in Australia, and in particular at the Commonwealth Government level with the introduction of the enhanced Commonwealth performance framework. With this has comes the request for "evidence-based performance stories".

This one-day workshop introduces the concept and method of performance story.

The term 'performance story' was introduced by John Mayne in a paper published in 2004. The encyclopaedia of evaluation defines a performance story as:

Essentially a short report about how a program contributed to outcomes. Although they may vary in content and format, most are short, mention program context and aims, relate to a plausible results chain, and are backed by empirical evidence (Dart and Mayne, 2005).

Performance story reports aim to strike a good balance between depth of information and brevity. They aim to be written in accessible language and help build a credible case about the contribution a program has made towards outcomes or targets. They help teams and organisations to focus on results and also provide a common language for discussing different programs.

This workshop will explore different approaches to performance story, and how performance story reports are developed. It will outline steps to building a report and explore the role of program logic and evidence in developing the report. It will be an interactive and engaging workshop involving case studies and group process.

Who should attend?
This workshop is aimed at anyone who is interested creating or commissioning a performance story at the project, program or organisational level. It caters for beginner to intermediate level. For those people who know of Jess Dart's work with the Most Significant Change technique (MSC) it is important to be clear that this workshop is not about MSC, but about an approach to reporting on results at a whole-of project or program level using multiple lines of evidence.

About the presenter
Jess Dart's professional interests are in evaluation methods, evaluation theory, collaborative approaches, and strategic planning. She has a PhD in program evaluation and an MSc in Sustainable Agriculture. Her doctoral research involved adapting and testing a story-based monitoring and evaluation tool named the 'Most Significant Change' technique (MSC). She went on to co-author the user-guide with Rick Davies. Jess is the founder of Clear Horizon Consulting a medium sized consulting company specialising in evaluation and strategy.
Jess has an extensive experience in performance story approaches. In 2008 to 2012 she championed the 'performance story reporting' pilot process with two divisions of the commonwealth government which led to over 20 performance story reports being written. She also developed a particular approach to documenting and creating performance stories named "Collaborative Outcome Reporting (COR).

Date: Thursday 17 March 2016, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: The Hub, National Centre of Indigenous Excellence, 180 George Street, Redfern 
Presenter: Duncan Rintoul
Register by: Wednesday 16 March 2016
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student members $220, Student non-members $302.50

About the workshop
This one-day course has been custom designed for people who want to commission better evaluations. It is for people with a role in planning, commissioning and managing evaluations. It is suitable for beginners through to those with a few years' experience who want to gain knowledge and consolidate their understanding of:
• different types of evaluation and how they can be used to inform policy, strategy and project work
• principles and steps in successfully planning and implementing an evaluation project
• techniques for developing and prioritising your evaluation questions
• effective strategies for stakeholder engagement in the evaluation process
• elements that make up a good evaluation brief / approach to market
• factors that influence the scale, budget and timeframe of an evaluation
• what to look for in an external evaluation team
• assessment of evaluation proposals and the procurement process
• management of evaluation consultancies
• ethical conduct, governance and risk management in evaluation.

The training is interactive and hands-on, with lots of practical examples and group activities through the day to keep the blood pumping and the brain ticking. It will provide you with tools that you can start using immediately.

Who should attend?
Anyone working in government, the community sector or business who has a role in planning, commissioning or managing evaluations. No prior experience in evaluation is required.

The course is limited to 20 participants. If the course books out, it will be run again.

About the presenterrintoul

Duncan Rintoul is a member of the AES Board with over 15 years' research and evaluation experience across a broad range of policy areas, organisational contexts and methodologies. His working week is currently split between the NSW Department of Education (where he is a Principal Evaluator in the Centre for Education Statistics and Evaluation) and writing up his PhD at the University of Wollongong (on questionnaire design for the web). He has also worked extensively in evaluation consultancy, and was on the Urbis team that won the AES Award for Evaluation Project of the Year in 2011. Duncan runs popular introductory courses in evaluation for the AES and the Australian Market and Social Research Society, and has also developed internal training programs for state and commonwealth government agencies with portfolios ranging from road safety and industry through to child protection and disability.

 

 

Date and Time: Thursday 3rd March 2016 3:30 to 5:00 pm
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, SYDNEY
Register by: Tuesday 1st March 6:00 pm (places are limited so please book early to avoid disappointment)
Cost: This seminar is free and is open to AES members and non-members alike. However, it is necessary to RSVP.

This seminar will provide information and facilitate discussion about major developments in evaluation being implemented by the Australian and NSW Governments. Brad Cook will discuss the Public Governance Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and Enhanced Commonwealth Performance Framework. Simon Draper will introduce the new NSW Government Program Evaluation Guidelines (January 2016), and Peter Ryan and Claudia Solomon will provide a central agency perspective on the Guidelines and the changes since the first Framework in 2013. Other members of the NSW Evaluation Strategy Working Group will be available to discuss how the Guidelines can be used by frontline agencies.

These two initiatives have widespread implications for the practice of evaluation in New South Wales of relevance to public service, NGO and consultant evaluators. This seminar will provide a forum to learn about these frameworks and to discuss their implications.

Speakers:
Australian Public Service
Brad Cook, Assistant Secretary, Performance, Reporting and Planning, Australian Government Department of Finance

NSW Public Sector
Simon Draper, Deputy Secretary, Economic Policy, NSW Premier and Cabinet
Peter Ryan, Principal Policy Officer, NSW Premier and Cabinet
Claudia Solomon, Director, Centre for Program Evaluation, NSW Treasury

More information: Ben Barnes This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Date and Time: Monday 29 February and Tuesday 1 March 2016, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: NSW Teachers Federation Conference Centre, Level 1, 23-33 Mary Street Surry Hill
Presenter: Gill Westhorp
Register by: Tuesday 23 February 2016
Fees: Members (Day one only) Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50 (Day one and two) Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550

About the workshop

Many policies and programs are implemented in large systems, or expect to make changes at multiple levels of a system. Many approaches to program theory either assume that the program itself is simple, or ignore the implications of context for whether and how programs work.

The first day of this program will introduce various approaches to 'systems', 'complexity' and 'context'. Participants will explore the implications for program design and for commissioning and conducting evaluations, and in particular, the many uses of theory for dealing with complexity.

The second day will focus on skills and strategies for evaluators working with complex systems. It will present a particular approach for

  • 'layering' systems, program theories and formal theories from different disciplines; and
  • using formal theories for evaluation design and analysis of evaluation findings.

Implications for tendering, managing evaluations, and reporting will also be discussed.

The first day is designed for evaluators and researchers, policy makers, strategic policy analysts, program designers, performance and quality improvement staff and others interested in conceptualising 'what works in complex systems'? The second day is appropriate for intermediate to advanced evaluators and researchers.

Each day will involve presentations, practical examples, small group work and whole group discussion.

About the presenterGill Westhorp200

Dr Gill Westhorp is an internationally-recognised specialist in realist research and evaluation methodologies, with an interest in the relationship between realist and complexity theories. She is Director of a small research and evaluation consultancy company; a University Fellow at Charles Darwin University; an Associate at RMIT University; a member of the core team for the RAMESES I and RAMESES II projects based in Oxford, UK; and a member of the Advisory Committee for the Centre for the Advancement of Realist Evaluation and Synthesis (CARES) at Liverpool University, UK.

Date and Time: Tuesday 8th December 3:30 to 5:00 pm (followed by Xmas networking drinks from 5 pm, at The Vault, 122 Pitt St)
Location: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, SYDNEY
Presenters: Ben Barnes, Principal Research Scientist, NSW Centre for Road Safety, Jen Davis, Specialist Advisor Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, Australian Human Rights Commission, Nicki Hutley, Director, Economic Advisory, Urbis and Kath Vaughan-Davies, Senior Consultant, ZEST Health Strategies
Registrations close: Friday 4th December 6:00 pm
Cost:  This is a free event

About:

This seminar will be a discussion of the aes15 Conference highlights. Each speaker will give a quick presentation of their personal highlights from the conference, and any themes they discerned across the conference. Interaction, questions and discussion will be encouraged! The seminar will be of interest to both those who did and those who did not attend the conference.

Please note that the presentations are available, should you wish to follow up on anything discussed at http://www.aes.asn.au/professional-learning/international-conference/previous-conferences/842-2015-aes-international-conference-melbourne-presentations.html

We are also keen to hear from you about possible topics for subsequent seminars, and any other local members services you would like the AES to be providing.

Date and time: Wednesday, 15 July 2015. 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: Saxons Training Facilities, Level 10, 10 Barrack Street, Sydney
Presenter: Dr John Gargani, Founder of Gargani + Company, Inc.  
Register online by: 14 July 2015
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

Social return on investment (SROI) is a new and controversial evaluation method. It is widely applied in the UK, Europe, and many international development settings. Demand for it in the US is rapidly growing. What is SROI? It is one application of valuation, representing the value stakeholders place on program impacts in monetary units. Specifically, SROI compares the value of impacts to the cost of producing them. It is strongly associated with social enterprise, impact investing, social impact bonds, value-for-money initiatives, and other efforts that combine business thinking with social betterment. In this hands-on workshop, you will learn the basics of how to conduct an SROI analysis. We will approach the method with a critical eye in order to plan, use, and interpret SROI effectively. You will leave the workshop with a better understanding of how to incorporate SROI into your practice, and how to engage clients and stakeholders in its implementation.

Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• interpret an SROI ratio
• understand how to estimate SROI ratios
• consider the strengths and weaknesses of SROI and how SROI applies to their work
• bring greater critical thinking to the interpretation of SROI reports
• use SROI to give voice to diverse stakeholder groups
• use SROI more effectively for funding decisions

About the presentergargani 13RT small-150x150
Dr John Gargani

John Gargani was recently elected the 2016 President of the American Evaluation Association.

He is President and Founder of Gargani + Company, Inc., a program design and evaluation firm located in Berkeley, California. Alongside supporting non-profit organizations, foundations, corporations, and government agencies achieve their social missions, John regularly writes about evaluation, shares his thoughts on at EvalBlog.com, teaches graduate classes on social entrepreneurship and program design, speaks at conferences around the world, and conducts workshops to train the next generation of evaluators.

Over the past 20 years, his work has taken him to diverse settings, including public housing projects, museums, countries adopting free market economies, and 19th century sailing ships. He has designed innovative social enterprises; directed large-scale randomized trials; and created novel technologies that measure how people think.

John holds three graduate degrees—a Ph.D. in Education from the University of California at Berkeley, where he studied measurement and evaluation; an M.S. in Statistics from New York University's Stern School of Business; and an M.B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business.

 

Date and time: Tuesday 14 July 2015, 3:30pm to 5:00pm
Venue: Australian Human Rights Commission, Level 3, 175 Pitt Street, Sydney
Presenters: George Argyrous (ANZSOG), Andrew Hawkins (ARTD Consultants), Karen Fisher (SPRC)
Cost: Free
Register by: Friday 10th July

About the workshop
This will be a conversation among evaluation practitioners about how to judge the quality of evidence that may be used in evaluations. The panel will discuss the various evidence hierarchies that have been proposed to judge evaluation evidence, and the problems and pitfalls in doing this. The discussion will allow plenty of opportunity for attendees to join in the conversation.

Who should attend
Anyone that has to consider a range of research evidence in evaluation work, and make judgements about the relative quality of that evidence.

About the presenters
George has been involved in public sector evaluation work in a number of capacities. He has worked with a number of major consultancy firms and also as an advisor to government agencies and NGOs commissioning evaluation work. He was involved as the external advisor to the development of the NSW Whole of Government Evaluation Framework, and has also run a number of evaluation courses through ANZSOG.

Andrew is a Principal Consultant with ARTD Consultants, a medium sized firm specialising in public sector evaluation and strategic planning. He works as a consultant, mentor and trainer in evaluation methodology and methods across the NSW and Commonwealth public and not for profit sectors. He led the team that won the Australasian Evaluation Society's Best Public Sector Evaluation Award in 2014 and is an Evaluation Fellow of the University of Melbourne's Centre for Program Evaluation.

Karen conducts research and evaluation on the organisation of social services in Australia and China. Her research interests include services in the community; disability and mental health services; project and service evaluation. Karen applies inclusive research methods with people with disability, families, policy officials and service providers. She leads the Social Policy Research Centre Disability Research Program, and the SPRC Communication and Engagement Committee.

For a copy of the presentations click here

Date and time: Thursday, 21 May 2015, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: National Centre of Indigenous Excellence, 166-180 George St, Redfern
Presenters: Duncan Rintoul and Vanessa Hood
Register online by: 20 May 2015
Fees: Members $440, Non-members $605, Student member $220, Student non-member $302.50

This one-day course has been custom designed for people who want to commission better evaluations. It is for people with a role in planning, commissioning and managing evaluations who want to gain knowledge, and consolidate their understanding, of:

  • key concepts in evaluation
  • principles and steps in planning and implementing evaluation projects
  • different types of evaluation and how they can be used policy, strategy and projects? practice
  • elements that make up a good evaluation proposal, including scope writing
  • techniques for developing and prioritising evaluation questions
  • consultation, stakeholder engagement and governance in commissioning evaluations
  • factors that influence the scale, budget and timeframe of an evaluation
  • assessment of evaluation proposals and the procurement process
  • ethical conduct and risk management in evaluation
  • managing evaluation consultancies
  • optimising the impact and use of evaluation for project teams and other stakeholders.

The training is interactive and hands-on, with lots of practical examples and group activities through the day to keep the blood pumping and the brain ticking.

It will provide you with tools that you can start using immediately!

Who should attend?
Anyone working in government, the community sector or business who has a role in planning, commissioning or managing evaluations. No prior experience in evaluation is required.

The course is limited to 20 participants. If the course books out, it will be run again.

About the presentersrintoul
Duncan Rintoul has over 15 years' research and evaluation experience across a broad range of policy areas, organisational settings and methodologies. He runs a consulting practice (www.rooftopsocial.com) and has previously held roles at the University of Wollongong, NSW Department of Family and Community Services, Urbis and Wesley Mission. Duncan has run popular introductory courses in evaluation for the AES, the Australian Market and Social Research Society, and the NSW Centre for Road Safety. He was on the Urbis team that won the AES Award for Excellence in Evaluation Project of the Year in 2011.

V Hood April 2011Vanessa Hood is a skilled facilitator and evaluator with over 15 years' experience. She has worked on capability building and behaviour change projects in a range of contexts, including agriculture and sustainability.
She is passionate about working with people in group and individual settings. She loves exploring creative ways of engaging with people, including using applied improvisation.

Date and time: Mon 4 and Tues 5 May 2105, 9am to 5pm (registration from 8.30am)
Location: National Centre of Indigenous Excellence, 180 George Street, Sydney
Register online by: 27 April 2015
Fees (GST inclusive): Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550AnneMarkiewicz18 200

Facilitator: Anne Markiewicz (pictured)

Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Frameworks are becoming increasingly important for developing an agreed approach to the assessment of results achieved and to aid organisational learning. The M&E Framework identifies expected results, key evaluation questions and the means to answer these questions through routine monitoring and periodic evaluation. It also provides a guide to the implementation of M&E processes over the life of a program or other initiative. Monitoring and evaluation functions are essential to the effective operation of programs and will contribute to the overall value derived from them. M&E Frameworks should support decision-making, allocation of resources and program refinement based on lessons learned.

This workshop follows the structure of the text book Developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks (in-press with SAGE, due July 2015) authored by Anne Markiewicz and Dr Ian Patrick. It will present a clear and staged conceptual model for the systematic development of an M&E Framework. It will examine a range of steps and techniques involved in the design and implementation of the framework; explore potential design issues and implementation barriers; cover the development of a Program Logic; the identification of key evaluation questions; the development of performance indicators; and identification of processes for data collection, on-going analysis and reflection based on data generated.
The facilitator will encourage interactive peer to peer dialogue to share experiences and learning, and also draw on case studies to encourage application of knowledge and skills to evaluation contexts.

Content

  • The importance and function of monitoring and evaluation processes
  • 'Table of Contents' for the development of an M&E Framework – what to do and in what order
  • Design of a viable M&E framework
  • Application of M&E frameworks to programs
  • Key challenges and barriers, and how to address them

Outcomes and Benefits

  • Understanding of an overall structure for the development of a M&E Framework
  • Identification of clear steps and stages involved in the process of development of an M&E Framework, and building knowledge and skills in their implementation
  • Use of case studies to develop key components of an M&E Framework for an initiative
  • Understand how to best support participatory processes in design and implementation of an M&E Framework

Who should attend?

This workshop offers professionals from across government, universities and not for profit and consulting organisations foundation skills in planning for monitoring and evaluation of a program. You would benefit most from the workshop if you have some prior knowledge of evaluation, particularly program theory and program logic and some practical experience with evaluation activities.

About the facilitator: Anne Markiewicz
Anne Markiewicz is Director of Anne Markiewicz and Associates, a consultancy that specialises in developing Monitoring and Evaluation Frameworks, and the delivering of training, mentoring and capacity building in monitoring and evaluation. Anne has been an evaluator for over 20 years and has been recognised by the Australasian Evaluation Society through receipt of two awards for excellence in evaluation. Anne has extensive experience in the design and implementation of monitoring and evaluation frameworks, integrating contemporary evaluation theory with the identification of good practice in monitoring and evaluation. Anne has diverse experience working in a wide range of sectors and contexts and has delivered this training program extensively in Australasia and in the USA and the UK.

Date and time: 18 and 25 March 2015 (this workshop is held over 2 consecutive Wednesdays), 9:00 am to 5:00 pm (registration from 8:30 am)
Venue: NSW Teachers Federation Conference Centre, 23-33 Mary Street, Surry Hills NSW 2010
Presenters: Duncan Rintoul and Margaret MacDonald
Register online by: 11 March 2014
Fees: Members $770, Non-members $935, Student member $385, Student non-member $550 (GST inclusive)

This two-day workshop provides a comprehensive overview of evaluation, suitable for beginners through to people with a few years' experience who want to gain knowledge and consolidate their understanding on:

  • Different types of evaluation, and what they are for
  • Evaluation designs and tools for developing them
  • Standard setting, measurement frameworks and causality
  • Using program logic to provide structure and focus in evaluations
  • Formulating and prioritising evaluation questions
  • Positioning, planning and implementation of evaluation
  • Data collection methodologies used by evaluators
  • Ethical conduct and risk management in evaluation
  • Evaluation reporting and use

The training is interactive and hands-on, with practical examples, group activities and guests spread over the two days It will provide you with tools which you can start using immediately.

This course can accommodate a maximum of 25 people and is expected to book out.

Who should attend?

How do I design and implement an evaluation that is really useful?
How can I manage stakeholder anxiety and get their involvement?
How can I ensure my evaluation is robust and can stand up to scrutiny?

If you have ever asked these questions (and others) about evaluation, then this course may well be for you. This is an excellent opportunity for new evaluators as well as project officers/managers who have responsibility for evaluation of projects to gain a solid grounding in the fundamentals of program evaluation. No prior knowledge about evaluation is required.

About the presenters
Duncan Rintoul has over 15 years' research and evaluation experience across a broad range of policy areas, organisational settings and methodologies. He runs a consulting practice (www.rooftopsocial.com) and has previously held roles at the University of Wollongong, Urbis, NSW Family and Community Services and Wesley Mission. Duncan serves on the AES Board and has developed introductory courses in evaluation for the AES, the Australian Market and Social Research Society, the NSW Centre for Road Safety and NSW Family and Community Services. He was on the Urbis team that won the AES Award for Excellence in Evaluation in 2011.

Margaret MacDonald is an independent policy and evaluation consultant with over 20 years evaluation experience, for a wide mix of government and non-government sector clients. A Visiting Fellow in evaluation for Charles Darwin University, Margaret has extensive evaluation experience in health and community services, and in programs for Indigenous people. She brings to evaluation a deep understanding of the role that evaluation plays in policy, strategy and program design and management across governments and sectors, informed by experience in senior management roles in the Australian Public Service and advocacy organisations. These roles have included positions in the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing (e.g. five years as the Director of Alcohol and Illicit Drug Policy), and in organisations such as the Australian Medical Association. She sits on the AES Professional Learning Committee and was instrumental in developing the Society's Evaluation Competency Framework, launched in 2013. Her academic background is in geography, education, public health, and evaluation.

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